Technical Note

Conservation Genetics Resources

, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 665-667

A reliable method for individual identification and gender determination of wild leopards (Panthera pardus fusca) using non-invasive samples

  • Trishna DuttaAffiliated withSmithsonian Conservation Biology InstituteDepartment of Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason University Email author 
  • , Sandeep SharmaAffiliated withSmithsonian Conservation Biology InstituteDepartment of Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason University
  • , Jesús E. MaldonadoAffiliated withSmithsonian Conservation Biology InstituteDepartment of Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason University
  • , Thomas C. WoodAffiliated withDepartment of Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason University
  • , John SeidenstickerAffiliated withSmithsonian Conservation Biology Institute

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Abstract

We describe a highly polymorphic microsatellite panel for identifying individual leopards using DNA from scat. After successfully screening 16 published microsatellites, we optimized a panel of 7 microsatellites that yields a Probability of Identity between siblings value of 5.24E−04. We used this panel to identify 217 individuals from 287 leopard scats collected from five tiger-reserves in Central India. We identified 101 males and 92 females by amplifying a fragment of the Amelogenin protein gene. This panel will be helpful to study genetic structure, gene flow, relatedness and sex ratio of leopards.

Keywords

Noninvasive DNA sampling Panthera pardus fusca Individual identification Microsatellite Sex assignment