Conservation Genetics Resources

, 1:273

Characterisation of polymorphic microsatellite markers in the widespread Australian seagrass, Posidonia australis Hook. f. (Posidoniaceae), with cross-amplification in the sympatric P. sinuosa

  • E. A. Sinclair
  • J. Anthony
  • G. T. Coupland
  • M. Waycott
  • M. D. Barrett
  • R. L. Barrett
  • M. L. Cambridge
  • M. J. Wallace
  • K. W. Dixon
  • S. L. Krauss
  • G. A. Kendrick
Technical Note

DOI: 10.1007/s12686-009-9067-y

Cite this article as:
Sinclair, E.A., Anthony, J., Coupland, G.T. et al. Conservation Genet Resour (2009) 1: 273. doi:10.1007/s12686-009-9067-y

Abstract

We developed 10 polymorphic microsatellite markers in the Australian seagrass Posidonia australis Hook. f. Markers were screened for their ability to detect within- and among-population genetic structure and variation. The markers showed a range in levels of polymorphism from fixed differences between the two sampled seagrass meadows to high levels of heterozygosity. These markers will be used to estimate gene flow across the species range, characterise the mating system through paternity analysis and pollen dispersal, characterise the nature and extent of clonality, and determine the genetic differentiation of local seagrass meadows to provide information on where to source local genetic provenance material for seagrass restoration projects. Seven of the 10 loci also amplified in the sympatric P. sinuosa and will be useful in future studies in population genetics and hybridisation.

Keywords

Posidonia australisMicrosatellitesClonal diversityRestorationCross-species amplificationPosidonia sinuosa

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. A. Sinclair
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Anthony
    • 1
  • G. T. Coupland
    • 2
  • M. Waycott
    • 3
  • M. D. Barrett
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. L. Barrett
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. L. Cambridge
    • 2
  • M. J. Wallace
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. W. Dixon
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. L. Krauss
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. A. Kendrick
    • 2
  1. 1.Botanic Gardens & Parks AuthorityWest PerthAustralia
  2. 2.School of Plant BiologyUniversity of Western AustraliaCrawleyAustralia
  3. 3.School of Marine and Tropical BiologyJames Cook UniversityTownsvilleAustralia