Mediterranean Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism

, 2:221

Are miracle diets miraculous? Review and analysis of a specific case: the Mayo Clinic Diet

Authors

    • Nutrition UnitFundación Universitaria Iberoamericana - FUNIBER
  • Irma Domínguez Azpíroz
    • Nutrition UnitFundación Universitaria Iberoamericana - FUNIBER
  • Sandra Jarrín Motte
    • Nutrition UnitFundación Universitaria Iberoamericana - FUNIBER
  • Anna Marín Bachs
    • Nutrition UnitFundación Universitaria Iberoamericana - FUNIBER
  • Maurizio Battino
    • Department of Biochemistry, Biology & Genetics Faculty of MedicineUniversità Politecnica delle Marche
  • Santos Gracia Villar
    • Nutrition UnitFundación Universitaria Iberoamericana - FUNIBER
Short Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s12349-009-0061-4

Cite this article as:
Sumalla Cano, S., Domínguez Azpíroz, I., Jarrín Motte, S. et al. Mediterr J Nutr Metab (2009) 2: 221. doi:10.1007/s12349-009-0061-4
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Abstract

Miracle diets are characterised by promises of fast weight loss without any effort. However as these types of diet lack many essential nutrients and are unbalanced, they may cause negative long-term health problems. The Mayo Clinic Diet, analysed in our study, was found to be unbalanced in the amount of macronutrients (47.65% fat, 32.06% proteins and 20.37% carbohydrates) and all minerals (the amount of minerals are under 50% of the RDA) and deficient in vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, D and E. As multiple studies show that weight loss is similar, independent of the macronutrient composition of the diet, and data from recent studies indicate that following these types of diets in the long term can be associated with an increase in mortality, recommended diets should have a wide variety of foods and be balanced in the amount of macro- and micronutrients, like the Mediterranean diet.

Keywords

Slimming dietsWeight-loss dietsHigh-protein dietsLow-carb dietsMediterranean diet
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© Springer-Verlag Italia 2009