Nano Research

, Volume 3, Issue 5, pp 307–316

Electrocondensation and evaporation of attoliter water droplets: Direct visualization using atomic force microscopy

Authors

  • Narendra Kurra
    • Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit and DST Unit on NanoscienceJawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research
  • Adina Scott
    • Birck Nanotechnology CenterPurdue University
    • Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit and DST Unit on NanoscienceJawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research
Open AccessResearch Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12274-010-1034-0

Cite this article as:
Kurra, N., Scott, A. & Kulkarni, G.U. Nano Res. (2010) 3: 307. doi:10.1007/s12274-010-1034-0

Abstract

Working with a biased atomic force microscope (AFM) tip in the tapping mode under ambient atmosphere, attoliter (10−18 L) water droplet patterns have been generated on a patterned carbonaceous surface. This is essentially electrocondensation of water leading to charged droplets, as evidenced from electrostatic force microscopy measurements. The droplets are unusual in that they exhibit a highly corrugated surface and evaporate rather slowly, taking several tens of minutes.
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1007%2Fs12274-010-1034-0/MediaObjects/12274_2010_1034_Fig1_HTML.jpg

Keywords

Electrocondensationattoliter water dropletsbiased atomic force microscope (AFM) lithographyelectron beam induced depositioncarbonaceous deposition
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Supplementary material

12274_2010_1034_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (1.1 mb)
Supplementary material, approximately 1.1 MB.

Copyright information

© Tsinghua University Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010