Review Article

Nano Research

, Volume 1, Issue 4, pp 259-272

Open Access This content is freely available online to anyone, anywhere at any time.

Random networks and aligned arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes for electronic device applications

  • Qing CaoAffiliated withDepartment of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • , John A. RogersAffiliated withDepartment of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignDepartment of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignDepartment of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignDepartment of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignFrederick-Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignBeckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Email author 

Abstract

Singled-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), in the form of ultrathin films of random networks, aligned arrays, or anything in between, provide an unusual type of electronic material that can be integrated into circuits in a conventional, scalable fashion. The electrical, mechanical, and optical properties of such films can, in certain cases, approach the remarkable characteristics of the individual SWNTs, thereby making them attractive for applications in electronics, sensors, and other systems. This review discusses the synthesis and assembly of SWNTs into thin film architectures of various types and provides examples of their use in digital electronic circuits with levels of integration approaching 100 transistors and in analog radio frequency (RF) systems with operating frequencies up to several gigahertz, including transistor radios in which SWNT transistors provide all of the active functionality. The results represent important steps in the development of an SWNT-based electronics technology that could find utility in areas such as flexible electronics, RF analog devices and others that might complement the capabilities of established systems.

http://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1007%2Fs12274-008-8033-4/MediaObjects/12274_2008_8033_Fig1_HTML.jpg

Keywords

Carbon nanotubes electronic devices thin-film transistors