Annals of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 46, Issue 3, pp 349–357

Association of Acute Coronary Syndrome-Induced Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms with Self-Reported Sleep

  • Jonathan A. Shaffer
  • Ian M. Kronish
  • Matthew Burg
  • Lynn Clemow
  • Donald Edmondson
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12160-013-9512-8

Cite this article as:
Shaffer, J.A., Kronish, I.M., Burg, M. et al. ann. behav. med. (2013) 46: 349. doi:10.1007/s12160-013-9512-8

Abstract

Background

Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are associated with recurrent ACS events and mortality. Poor sleep may be a mechanism, but the association between PTSD and sleep after ACS is unknown.

Purpose

This study aims to estimate the association between ACS-induced PTSD symptoms and self-reported sleep.

Methods

ACS-induced PTSD symptoms were assessed 1-month post-ACS in 188 adults using the Impact of Events Scale-Revised. Sleep was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Linear and logistic regression models were used to determine whether PTSD symptoms were associated with self-reported sleep, independent of sociodemographic and clinical covariates.

Results

In adjusted models, ACS-induced PTSD symptoms were associated with worse overall sleep (β = 0.22, p = 0.003) and greater impairment in six of seven components of sleep (all p values <0.05).

Conclusions

ACS-induced PTSD symptoms may be associated with poor sleep, which may explain why PTSD confers increased cardiovascular risk after ACS.

Keywords

Posttraumatic stress disorderSleepAcute coronary syndrome

Copyright information

© The Society of Behavioral Medicine 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan A. Shaffer
    • 1
  • Ian M. Kronish
    • 1
  • Matthew Burg
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lynn Clemow
    • 1
    • 3
  • Donald Edmondson
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular HealthColumbia University Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Internal MedicineYale UniversityNew HavenUSA
  3. 3.Department of Family Medicine and Community HealthRobert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and DentistryNew BrunswickUSA