Annals of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 43, Issue 2, pp 262–270

Smoking Cessation and Quality of Life: Changes in Life Satisfaction Over 3 Years Following a Quit Attempt

Authors

    • Center for Tobacco Research and InterventionUniversity of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
    • Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention
  • Susan Kenford
    • Department of PsychologyXavier University
  • Michael C. Fiore
    • Center for Tobacco Research and InterventionUniversity of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
  • Timothy B. Baker
    • Center for Tobacco Research and InterventionUniversity of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12160-011-9329-2

Cite this article as:
Piper, M.E., Kenford, S., Fiore, M.C. et al. ann. behav. med. (2012) 43: 262. doi:10.1007/s12160-011-9329-2

Abstract

Background

There has been limited research addressing changes in subjective well-being as a result of quitting smoking.

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to use longitudinal data to determine the relation between smoking cessation and subjective measures of well-being, including global quality of life (QOL), health-related QOL (HR-QOL), affect, relationship satisfaction, and stressor occurrence.

Methods

As part of a randomized, placebo-controlled smoking cessation trial, 1,504 participants (58.2% women, 83.9% white) completed assessments and had their smoking status biochemically confirmed at baseline and years 1 and 3 post-quit.

Results

Compared with continuing smokers, quitters showed improved global QOL, HR-QOL, and affect at years 1 and 3 and fewer stressors by year 3. Smoking status did not influence marital relationship satisfaction.

Conclusions

Successful quitters, in contrast to continuing smokers, reported improved subjective well-being, which could be used to motivate quit attempts by individuals with concerns about what life will be like without cigarettes.

Keywords

Smoking Smoking cessation Quality of life Health Marital satisfaction Affect

Copyright information

© The Society of Behavioral Medicine 2011