Journal of African American Studies

, Volume 17, Issue 3, pp 290–307

Marital Well-Being Over Time Among Black and White Americans: The First Seven Years

  • Edna Brown
  • Terri L. Orbuch
  • José A. Bauermeister
  • Brandyn-Dior McKinley
ARTICLES

DOI: 10.1007/s12111-012-9234-1

Cite this article as:
Brown, E., Orbuch, T.L., Bauermeister, J.A. et al. J Afr Am St (2013) 17: 290. doi:10.1007/s12111-012-9234-1

Abstract

We examined patterns of marital well-being over the first 7 years of marriage and whether factors connected to early marital well-being during year 1 impacted marital well-being over time. Data were collected as part of a longitudinal panel study following 199 Black American and 174 White American during the first 7 years of marriage. Multilevel growth curve modeling revealed that race, income, and premarital child affected husbands’ marital well-being in year 1. Education, wives’ employment status, and divorced parents influenced wives’ marital well-being at year 1. After accounting for differences in these early marital conditions, having a child before marriage was significant in predicting the rates of change over time for husbands. Divorced parents affected the rate of change in marital well-being for wives. The findings suggest that as couples settle into their marriages, risk factors have fewer consequences on marital well-being.

Keywords

RaceBlack AmericansGenderMarriageLongitudinal researchMarital well-being

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edna Brown
    • 1
  • Terri L. Orbuch
    • 2
    • 3
  • José A. Bauermeister
    • 4
  • Brandyn-Dior McKinley
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Human Development and Family StudiesUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA
  2. 2.Institute for Social ResearchUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  3. 3.Department of SociologyOakland UniversityRochesterUSA
  4. 4.Department of Health Behavior and Health EducationUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA