Theory in Biosciences

, Volume 133, Issue 3, pp 165–173

Scaling of the mean and variance of population dynamics under fluctuating regimes

  • Cino Pertoldi
  • S. Faurby
  • D. H. Reed
  • J. Knape
  • M. Björklund
  • P. Lundberg
  • V. Kaitala
  • V. Loeschcke
  • L. A. Bach
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s12064-014-0201-3

Cite this article as:
Pertoldi, C., Faurby, S., Reed, D.H. et al. Theory Biosci. (2014) 133: 165. doi:10.1007/s12064-014-0201-3

Abstract

Theoretical ecologists have long sought to understand how the persistence of populations depends on the interactions between exogenous (biotic and abiotic) and endogenous (e.g., demographic and genetic) drivers of population dynamics. Recent work focuses on the autocorrelation structure of environmental perturbations and its effects on the persistence of populations. Accurate estimation of extinction times and especially determination of the mechanisms affecting extinction times is important for biodiversity conservation. Here we examine the interaction between environmental fluctuations and the scaling effect of the mean population size with its variance. We investigate how interactions between environmental and demographic stochasticity can affect the mean time to extinction, change optimal patch size dynamics, and how it can alter the often-assumed linear relationship between the census size and the effective population size. The importance of the correlation between environmental and demographic variation depends on the relative importance of the two types of variation. We found the correlation to be important when the two types of variation were approximately equal; however, the importance of the correlation diminishes as one source of variation dominates. The implications of these findings are discussed from a conservation and eco-evolutionary point of view.

Keywords

Environmental variability Effective population size Extinction Scaling effect Temporal autocorrelations in the environment 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cino Pertoldi
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Faurby
    • 3
    • 4
  • D. H. Reed
    • 3
    • 5
  • J. Knape
    • 6
  • M. Björklund
    • 7
  • P. Lundberg
    • 8
  • V. Kaitala
    • 9
  • V. Loeschcke
    • 3
    • 5
  • L. A. Bach
    • 10
  1. 1.Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Section of Biology and Environmental ScienceAalborg UniversityAalborgDenmark
  2. 2.Aalborg ZooAalborgDenmark
  3. 3.Department of BioSciencesAarhus UniversityAarhus CDenmark
  4. 4.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of California Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA
  5. 5.Department of BiologyUniversity of LouisvilleLouisvilleUSA
  6. 6.Department of Environmental Science, Policy and ManagementUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  7. 7.Department of Animal Ecology, Evolutionary Biology Centre (EBC)Uppsala UniversityUppsalaSweden
  8. 8.Department of Theoretical Ecology, Ecology BuildingLund UniversityLundSweden
  9. 9.Integrative Ecology Unit, Department of BiosciencesUniversity of HelsinkiHelsinkiFinland
  10. 10.Interacting Minds CentreAarhus UniversityAarhus CDenmark