Food and Bioprocess Technology

, Volume 6, Issue 7, pp 1644–1654

Chemical Composition, Antioxidant Capacity, and Sensory Quality of Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Arils and Rind as Affected by Drying Method

Authors

    • Departamento de Tecnología Agroalimentaria, Grupo Calidad y Seguridad AlimentariaUniversidad Miguel Hernández
  • Adam Figiel
    • Institute of Agricultural EngineeringWrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences
  • Francisca Hernández
    • Departamento de Producción Vegetal y Microbiología. Grupo de Fruticultura y Técnicas de ProducciónUniversidad Miguel Hernández
  • Pablo Melgarejo
    • Departamento de Producción Vegetal y Microbiología. Grupo de Fruticultura y Técnicas de ProducciónUniversidad Miguel Hernández
  • Krzysztof Lech
    • Institute of Agricultural EngineeringWrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences
  • Ángel A. Carbonell-Barrachina
    • Departamento de Tecnología Agroalimentaria, Grupo Calidad y Seguridad AlimentariaUniversidad Miguel Hernández
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s11947-012-0790-0

Cite this article as:
Calín-Sánchez, Á., Figiel, A., Hernández, F. et al. Food Bioprocess Technol (2013) 6: 1644. doi:10.1007/s11947-012-0790-0

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate the application of: (1) freeze drying, (2) convective drying (50, 60, or 70 °C), (3) vacuum–microwave drying (240, 360, or 480 W), and (4) a combined method of convective pre-drying and vacuum–microwave finish drying in the processing of pomegranate arils and rind. The quality parameters under study included sugars and organic acids, punicalagins and ellagic acid, total polyphenols, total antioxidant activity, and sensory quality. In general, drying led to a reduction in all studied parameters; however, the behavior of arils and rind was different. Vacuum–microwave drying at 240 or 360 W was the best drying treatment for arils, while rind required freeze drying or soft conditions of convective drying (50 °C). Further research is needed to obtain proper results with convective pre-drying and vacuum–microwave finish drying of arils and rind. With proper selection of the drying protocol, high-quality dried arils will be available for consumers; these arils will be characterized by high contents of fructose (25 g 100 g−1), phytic acid (2.2 g 100 g−1), punicalagins (0.57 mg g−1), total polyphenols (1.6 mg eq gallic acid g−1), high antioxidant capacity (0.6 mg eq Trolox g−1), and high intensities of garnet color, sweetness, sourness, and fresh pomegranate aroma. Besides, dried rind with very high contents of active compounds (123 mg g−1 of punicalagins and 108 mg eq gallic acid g−1) and high antioxidant capacity (26 mg eq Trolox g−1) will be also available as functional material.

Keywords

Antioxidant capacityDescriptive sensory analysisDrying kineticsOrganic acidsPolyphenolsPunicalagins

Nomenclature

db

Dry basis

db

Bulk density (kilograms per cubic meter)

wb

Wet basis

m

Mass (kilograms)

M0

Initial moisture content (kilograms per kilogram dry basis)

Vb

Bulk volume (cubic meters)

ANOVA

Analysis of variance

AOC

Antioxidant capacity

CD

Convective drying

CPD

Convective pre-drying

DSA

Descriptive sensory analysis

dw

Dry weight

EA

Ellagic acid

FD

Freeze drying

HPLC

High-performance liquid chromatography

PC

Punicalagins

PG

Pomegranate

TP

Total polyphenols

VMD

Vacuum–microwave drying

VMFD

Vacuum–microwave finish drying

VWP

Volume of woody portion

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012