Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health

, Volume 8, Issue 5, pp 483–494

Temporal change of PM10 and its mass fraction during a dust storm in September 2009 in Australia

  • Rupak Aryal
  • Simon Beecham
  • Mohammad Kamruzzaman
  • Samantha Conner
  • Byeong-Kyu Lee
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11869-014-0297-0

Cite this article as:
Aryal, R., Beecham, S., Kamruzzaman, M. et al. Air Qual Atmos Health (2015) 8: 483. doi:10.1007/s11869-014-0297-0

Abstract

Frequent dust storms are a major concern in Australia due to associated human health risks and potential economic losses. From 23 to 24 September 2009, a dust storm passed over many east coast regions of Australia. This blanketed them with dust and reduced the visibility to a few hundred meters for several hours. The respirable particulate matter less than 10 μm (PM10) was monitored at 22 locations across New South Wales (NSW) by the Environmental Protection Agency. In addition, samples were collected in Sydney using a nine-stage cascade impactor both during and after the dust storm. The PM10 concentration over most of NSW jumped from less than 50 μg/m3 to more than 10,000 μg/m3 within a couple of hours and then dropped again to more normal levels (<50 μg/m3). The normal bimodal particle size distribution was observed to change to a multimodal distribution during a dust storm event. Also, the elemental ratio of Al to Si increased from 0.14 to 0.39 during the storm. An Al/Si ratio >0.3 indicates that the dust originated from inland desert areas and indeed was closely matched to Lake Eyre Basin crustal element data indicating it had travelled from central Australia to the eastern coasts.

Keywords

PM10 Dust storm Particle size distribution Mineralogical content 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rupak Aryal
    • 1
  • Simon Beecham
    • 1
  • Mohammad Kamruzzaman
    • 1
  • Samantha Conner
    • 2
  • Byeong-Kyu Lee
    • 3
  1. 1.Centre for Water Management and Reuse, School of Natural and Built EnvironmentsUniversity of South AustraliaMawson LakesAustralia
  2. 2.Bureau of MeteorologyKent TownAustralia
  3. 3.School of Civil EngineeringUniversity of UlsanUlsanKorea