Evolutionary Biology

, Volume 36, Issue 2, pp 248–255

Homology: Homeostatic Property Cluster Kinds in Systematics and Evolution

Essay

DOI: 10.1007/s11692-009-9054-y

Cite this article as:
Assis, L.C.S. & Brigandt, I. Evol Biol (2009) 36: 248. doi:10.1007/s11692-009-9054-y

Abstract

Taxa and homologues can in our view be construed both as kinds and as individuals. However, the conceptualization of taxa as natural kinds in the sense of homeostatic property cluster kinds has been criticized by some systematists, as it seems that even such kinds cannot evolve due to their being homeostatic. We reply by arguing that the treatment of transformational and taxic homologies, respectively, as dynamic and static aspects of the same homeostatic property cluster kind represents a good perspective for supporting the conceptualization of taxa as kinds. The focus on a phenomenon of homology based on causal processes (e.g., connectivity, activity-function, genetics, inheritance, and modularity) and implying relationship with modification yields a notion of natural kinds conforming to the phylogenetic-evolutionary framework. Nevertheless, homeostatic property cluster kinds in taxonomic and evolutionary practice must be rooted in the primacy of epistemological classification (homology as observational properties) over metaphysical generalization (series of transformation and common ancestry as unobservational processes). The perspective of individuating characters exclusively by historical-transformational independence instead of their developmental, structural, and functional independence fails to yield a sufficient practical interplay between theory and observation. Purely ontological and ostensional perspectives in evolution and phylogeny (e.g., an ideographic character concept and PhyloCode’s ‘individualism’ of clades) may be pragmatically contested in the case of urgent issues in biodiversity research, conservation, and systematics.

Keywords

CharactersIndividualsMonophylyNatural kindsPhylogenySimilarityTaxonomyTransformational and taxic homology

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratório de Sistemática Vegetal, Departamento de BotânicaUniversidade de São PauloSão PauloBrazil
  2. 2.Department of PhilosophyUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada