Brain Imaging and Behavior

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 901–910

Male brain ages faster: the age and gender dependence of subcortical volumes

  • András Király
  • Nikoletta Szabó
  • Eszter Tóth
  • Gergő Csete
  • Péter Faragó
  • Krisztián Kocsis
  • Anita Must
  • László Vécsei
  • Zsigmond Tamás Kincses
Original Research

DOI: 10.1007/s11682-015-9468-3

Cite this article as:
Király, A., Szabó, N., Tóth, E. et al. Brain Imaging and Behavior (2016) 10: 901. doi:10.1007/s11682-015-9468-3

Abstract

Effects of gender on grey matter (GM) volume differences in subcortical structures of the human brain have consistently been reported. Recent research evidence suggests that both gender and brain size influences volume distribution in subcortical areas independently. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of the interplay between brain size, gender and age contributing to volume differences of subcortical GM in the human brain. High-resolution T1-weighted images were acquired from 53 healthy males and 50 age-matched healthy females. Total GM volume was determined using voxel-based morphometry. We used model-based subcortical segmentation analysis to measure the volume of subcortical nuclei. Main effects of gender, brain volume and aging on subcortical structures were examined using multivariate analysis of variance. No significant difference was found in total brain volume between the two genders after correcting for total intracranial volume. Our analysis revealed significantly larger hippocampus volume for females. Additionally, GM volumes of the caudate nucleus, putamen and thalamus displayed a significant age-related decrease in males as compared to females. In contrast to this only the thalamic volume loss proved significant for females. Strikingly, GM volume decreases faster in males than in females emphasizing the interplay between aging and gender on subcortical structures. These findings might have important implications for the interpretation of the effects of unalterable factors (i.e. gender and age) in cross-sectional structural MRI studies. Furthermore, the volume distribution and changes of subcortical structures have been consistently related to several neuropsychiatric disorders (e.g. Parkinson’s disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, etc.). Understanding these changes might yield further insight in the course and prognosis of these disorders.

Keywords

Subcortical structures Brain volume Gender Aging MRI 

Supplementary material

11682_2015_9468_MOESM1_ESM.docx (73 kb)
ESM 1(DOCX 19 kb)
11682_2015_9468_Fig5_ESM.gif (763 kb)
ESM 2

(GIF 970 kb)

11682_2015_9468_MOESM2_ESM.eps (232 kb)
High resolution image (EPS 231 kb)
11682_2015_9468_MOESM3_ESM.doc (50 kb)
ESM 3(DOC 49.5 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • András Király
    • 1
  • Nikoletta Szabó
    • 1
    • 2
  • Eszter Tóth
    • 1
  • Gergő Csete
    • 1
  • Péter Faragó
    • 1
  • Krisztián Kocsis
    • 1
  • Anita Must
    • 1
  • László Vécsei
    • 1
    • 3
  • Zsigmond Tamás Kincses
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Neurology, Albert Szent-Györgyi Clinical CenterUniversity of SzegedSzegedHungary
  2. 2.International Clinical Research CenterSt. Anne’s University Hospital BrnoBrnoCzech Republic
  3. 3.MTA-SZTE Neuroscience Research GroupSzegedHungary

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