, Volume 22, Issue 2, pp 87-92
Date: 22 Jun 2010

Antioxidant enzymes and cancer

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Abstract

Although oxidation is the most common biological and energy producing reaction, oxidative stress is harmful to cell, because the products of oxidation such as free radicals and peroxides damage the cellular components, causing several diseases. Damage in DNA is responsible for cancer formation and progression. However, several enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase etc. act as antioxidants to influence oxidative stress. Polymorphisms in these enzymes are supposed to be associated with DNA damage and subsequently the individual’s risk of cancer susceptibility. This review article aims to further elucidate the relationship between antioxidant enzymes and cancers by summarizing the findings of some of the important study concerning expression levels and genetic polymorphisms of antioxidant enzymes in cancer patients.

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China(No.30371660) and the grant from the Chinese Medical Board (CMB) of New York (No.99-698).