Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery

, Volume 18, Issue 3, pp 584–591

Preoperative Colonic Stents Versus Emergency Surgery for Acute Left-Sided Malignant Colonic Obstruction: A Meta-analysis

Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11605-013-2344-9

Cite this article as:
Huang, X., Lv, B., Zhang, S. et al. J Gastrointest Surg (2014) 18: 584. doi:10.1007/s11605-013-2344-9

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of colonic stenting as a bridge to surgery versus emergency surgery for acute left-sided malignant colonic obstruction.

Methods

Randomized clinical trials (RCT) that compared the efficacy or safety of preoperative colonic stents versus emergency surgery for acute left-sided malignant colonic obstruction were searched in medical databases, including PubMed, OVID, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. Statistical heterogeneity between trials was evaluated by Revman 5.1 and was considered to exist at I2 > 50 %.

Results

Seven RCTs were identified. There was a total of 382 patients, 195 who received a colonic stent and 187 who received emergency surgery. Compared with the emergency surgery group, the colonic stent group achieved significantly more favorable rates of permanent stoma, primary anastomosis, wound infection, and overall complications. There was no significant difference between the two groups in anastomotic leakage, mortality, or intra-abdominal infection. Inspection of funnel plots for all outcome measures did not reveal evidence of publication bias.

Conclusions

Self-expanding metal stents serve as a safe and effective bridge to subsequent surgery in patients with obstructing left-sided colon cancer. They can significantly improve one-stage surgery rates, and decrease the rates of permanent stoma and wound infection.

Keywords

Stents Colorectal surgery Intestinal obstruction Meta-analysis Randomized controlled trial 

Copyright information

© The Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated HospitalZhejiang Chinese Medical UniversityHangzhou CityChina

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