HSS Journal ®

, Volume 8, Issue 3, pp 283–286

Adoption of Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty at Hospital for Special Surgery: a Cohort Study

Current Topics Concerning Joint Preservation and Minimally Invasive Surgery of the Hip

DOI: 10.1007/s11420-012-9284-x

Cite this article as:
Su, E.P. & Su, S.L. HSS Jrnl (2012) 8: 283. doi:10.1007/s11420-012-9284-x
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Abstract

Background

Hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) is an alternative to traditional total hip replacement (THR) that allows for the preservation of femoral bone. It is a more technically difficult procedure that has led some researchers to report an unsatisfactory learning curve (Berend et al., J Bone Joint Surg Am Suppl 2:89–92, 2011; Mont et al., Clin Orthop Relat Res 465:63–70, 2007).

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the adoption of HRA at our institution, examining the clinical results, revision rate, and modes of failure. Additionally, a comparison of three different implant systems was performed.

Methods

A retrospective review of a consecutive series of HRA performed at our institution between the years 2004 and 2009 was carried out. A total of 820 HRA with a minimum of 2 years of follow-up were included in the study. The majority of included patients were males (70%), with osteoarthritis (92%). The average age was 49.8 years, and the mean BMI was 27.5 kg/m2.

Results

The average Harris hip score improved from 61 to 96.5 postoperatively. Thirteen revisions (1.6%) were performed for femoral neck fracture, femoral head osteonecrosis, acetabular loosening, metal reactivity/metallosis, and metal allergy. The overall Kaplan–Meier survival curve with revision surgery as an endpoint showed 98.5% survival at 5 years. There were no observable differences in clinical scores or revision rates between the different implant systems.

Conclusions

HRA can be successfully adopted with a low complication rate, given careful patient selection, specialized surgical training, and use of good implant design.

Keywords

hip resurfacing arthroplastyresultscomplicationslearning curve

Copyright information

© Hospital for Special Surgery 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Hospital for Special SurgeryNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Clinical Orthopaedic SurgeryWeill Cornell Medical CollegeNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Orthopedic SurgerySt. Joseph’s Regional Medical CenterPattersonUSA