Water, Air, & Soil Pollution

, 225:1880

Trends in Surface Water Chemistry in Acidified Areas in Europe and North America from 1990 to 2008

  • Øyvind A. Garmo
  • Brit Lisa Skjelkvåle
  • Heleen A. de Wit
  • Luca Colombo
  • Chris Curtis
  • Jens Fölster
  • Andreas Hoffmann
  • Jakub Hruška
  • Tore Høgåsen
  • Dean S. Jeffries
  • W. Bill Keller
  • Pavel Krám
  • Vladimir Majer
  • Don T. Monteith
  • Andrew M. Paterson
  • Michela Rogora
  • Dorota Rzychon
  • Sandra Steingruber
  • John L. Stoddard
  • Jussi Vuorenmaa
  • Adam Worsztynowicz
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11270-014-1880-6

Cite this article as:
Garmo, Ø.A., Skjelkvåle, B.L., de Wit, H.A. et al. Water Air Soil Pollut (2014) 225: 1880. doi:10.1007/s11270-014-1880-6

Abstract

Acidification of lakes and rivers is still an environmental concern despite reduced emissions of acidifying compounds. We analysed trends in surface water chemistry of 173 acid-sensitive sites from 12 regions in Europe and North America. In 11 of 12 regions, non-marine sulphate (SO4*) declined significantly between 1990 and 2008 (−15 to −59 %). In contrast, regional and temporal trends in nitrate were smaller and less uniform. In 11 of 12 regions, chemical recovery was demonstrated in the form of positive trends in pH and/or alkalinity and/or acid neutralising capacity (ANC). The positive trends in these indicators of chemical recovery were regionally and temporally less distinct than the decline in SO4* and tended to flatten after 1999. From an ecological perspective, the chemical quality of surface waters in acid-sensitive areas in these regions has clearly improved as a consequence of emission abatement strategies, paving the way for some biological recovery.

Keywords

Acid deposition Surface waters Trend analysis Monitoring network Chemical recovery 

Supplementary material

11270_2014_1880_MOESM1_ESM.docx (25 kb)
ESM 1(DOCX 24 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Øyvind A. Garmo
    • 1
  • Brit Lisa Skjelkvåle
    • 2
  • Heleen A. de Wit
    • 2
  • Luca Colombo
    • 3
  • Chris Curtis
    • 4
  • Jens Fölster
    • 5
  • Andreas Hoffmann
    • 6
  • Jakub Hruška
    • 7
    • 8
  • Tore Høgåsen
    • 2
  • Dean S. Jeffries
    • 9
  • W. Bill Keller
    • 10
  • Pavel Krám
    • 7
  • Vladimir Majer
    • 7
  • Don T. Monteith
    • 11
  • Andrew M. Paterson
    • 12
  • Michela Rogora
    • 13
  • Dorota Rzychon
    • 14
  • Sandra Steingruber
    • 15
  • John L. Stoddard
    • 16
  • Jussi Vuorenmaa
    • 17
  • Adam Worsztynowicz
    • 14
  1. 1.Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA)OttestadNorway
  2. 2.Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA)OsloNorway
  3. 3.University of Applied Sciences of Southern SwitzerlandCanobbioSwitzerland
  4. 4.GAESUniversity of the WitwatersrandJohannesburgSouth Africa
  5. 5.Swedish University of Agricultural SciencesUppsalaSweden
  6. 6.UmweltbundesamtDessauGermany
  7. 7.Czech Geological SurveyPragueCzech Republic
  8. 8.Global Change Research Centre, Academy of Sciences of the Czech RepublicBrnoCzech Republic
  9. 9.Environment CanadaBurlingtonCanada
  10. 10.Laurentian UniversitySudburyCanada
  11. 11.NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Lancaster Environment CentreLancasterUnited Kingdom
  12. 12.Ontario Ministry of EnvironmentDorsetCanada
  13. 13.CNR Institute of Ecosystem StudyVerbania PallanzaItaly
  14. 14.Institute for Ecology of Industrial AreasKatowicePoland
  15. 15.Ufficio aria, clima e energie rinnovabiliBellinzonaSwitzerland
  16. 16.US Environmental Protection AgencyCorvallisUSA
  17. 17.Finnish Environment InstituteHelsinkiFinland