Sex Roles

, Volume 62, Issue 9, pp 615–622

Religion and Sexism: The Moderating Role of Participant Gender

Authors

    • Rosemead School of PsychologyBiola University
  • M. Elizabeth L. Hall
    • Rosemead School of PsychologyBiola University
  • Tamara L. Anderson
    • Rosemead School of PsychologyBiola University
  • Keith Edwards
    • Rosemead School of PsychologyBiola University
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11199-010-9754-x

Cite this article as:
Maltby, L.E., Hall, M.E.L., Anderson, T.L. et al. Sex Roles (2010) 62: 615. doi:10.1007/s11199-010-9754-x

Abstract

The present study examined the relationship between gender, religious belief and ambivalent sexism. Specifically, this study tested the hypothesis that participant gender moderates the relationship between religious belief and ambivalent sexism. Three-hundred thirty seven Evangelical Christian undergraduate students from the Southwestern United States were administered the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory and the Christian Orthodoxy Scale. Results showed that gender moderated the relationship between Christian orthodoxy and Protective Paternalism. This finding suggests the importance of intervening variables, such as gender, in understanding the relationship between religion and sexism.

Keywords

ReligionGenderAmbivalent sexismMediator

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010