International Journal for Philosophy of Religion

, Volume 69, Issue 3, pp 155–171

The concept of the highest good in Kierkegaard and Kant


DOI: 10.1007/s11153-010-9238-5

Cite this article as:
Fremstedal, R. Int J Philos Relig (2011) 69: 155. doi:10.1007/s11153-010-9238-5


This article tries to make sense of the concept of the highest good (eternal bliss) in Søren Kierkegaard by comparing it to the analysis of the highest good found in Immanuel Kant. The comparison with Kant’s more systematic analysis helps us clarify the meaning and importance of the concept in Kierkegaard as well as to shed new light on the conceptual relation between Kant and Kierkegaard. The article argues that the concept of the highest good is of systematic importance in Kierkegaard, although previous research has tended to overlook this, no doubt due to Kierkegaard’s cryptic use of the concept. It is argued that Kierkegaard’s concept of the highest good is much closer to Kant’s than what previous research has indicated. In particular, Kant and Kierkegaard see the highest good not only as comprising of virtue and happiness (bliss), but also as being the Kingdom of God.


Immanuel KantSøren KierkegaardHappinessVirtueKingdom of GodThe highest goodEternal blissReligion

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyNorwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)TrondheimNorway