Original Paper

Psychiatric Quarterly

, Volume 77, Issue 3, pp 231-238

Effects of Medical Crisis Intervention on Anxiety, Depression, and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms: A Meta-Analysis

  • Amy B. StapletonAffiliated withJohns Hopkins School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Loyola College in Maryland Email author 
  • , Jeffrey LatingAffiliated withJohns Hopkins School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Loyola College in Maryland
  • , Matthew KirkhartAffiliated withJohns Hopkins School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Loyola College in Maryland
  • , George S. EverlyJr.Affiliated withJohns Hopkins School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Loyola College in Maryland

Rent the article at a discount

Rent now

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

A meta-analysis of 11 studies (N=2124) investigating the impact of individual crisis intervention with medical patients yielded a significant, overall moderate effect size, d=0.44. The strongest effect of individual crisis intervention was on posttraumatic stress symptoms (d=0.57) and anxiety symptoms (d=0.52). Specific moderating factors, such as single versus multiple sessions, single versus multiple components of intervention, and level of interventionists’ training, were also analyzed. In sum, the results support highly trained interventionists continuing to provide multi-session interventions in order to mitigate posttraumatic symptomatology following traumatic events.

Keywords

Crisis intervention Trauma PTSD Medical patients