Political Behavior

, Volume 35, Issue 2, pp 215–235

Voter Confidence and the Election-Day Voting Experience

  • Ryan L. Claassen
  • David B. Magleby
  • J. Quin Monson
  • Kelly D. Patterson
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s11109-012-9202-4

Cite this article as:
Claassen, R.L., Magleby, D.B., Monson, J.Q. et al. Polit Behav (2013) 35: 215. doi:10.1007/s11109-012-9202-4

Abstract

The scholarly literature provides mixed guidance on the question of whether DREs or optical scan systems inspire greater confidence. We bring new evidence to bear on the debate using a unique exit poll and a nationally representative survey, both of which examine a wide range of voting experiences. Having detailed information about voting experiences enables us to investigate both the direct effects of DRE/optical scan voting and the indirect effects through voting experiences. Doing so reveals new information about the relationships between voting technology, voting experiences, and voter confidence. Indeed, the type of machine one uses has very different direct and indirect effects on voter confidence—a finding that may help explain scholarly disagreement over voters’ reactions to different types of voting machines.

Keywords

Voting Confidence Voting machine DRE Optical scan 

Supplementary material

11109_2012_9202_MOESM1_ESM.doc (754 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 753 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryan L. Claassen
    • 1
  • David B. Magleby
    • 2
  • J. Quin Monson
    • 3
  • Kelly D. Patterson
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceKent State UniversityKentUSA
  2. 2.Department of Political ScienceBrigham Young UniversityProvoUSA
  3. 3.Department of Political ScienceBrigham Young UniversityProvoUSA