Plant and Soil

, Volume 377, Issue 1, pp 169–177

Soil microbial activity in relation to dissolved organic matter properties under different tree species

  • Oili Kiikkilä
  • Sanna Kanerva
  • Veikko Kitunen
  • Aino Smolander
Regular Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11104-013-1988-2

Cite this article as:
Kiikkilä, O., Kanerva, S., Kitunen, V. et al. Plant Soil (2014) 377: 169. doi:10.1007/s11104-013-1988-2

Abstract

Background and aims

The total concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) has often been observed to correlate positively with soil microbial respiration. The aim was to explain the correlation with the properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM).

Methods

A dataset from previously published papers was gathered together and subjected to multivariate analyses. Samples were collected from five tree species experiments in Finland. The degradability of DOM was assessed by measuring bacterial and fungal growth in DOM. The chemical properties of DOM were assessed by XAD resin fractionation and molecular weight. Soil microbial activity was assessed as C and N mineralization and microbial biomass.

Results

Both low and high molecular weight compounds, as well as hydrophilic neutral compounds, seemed to be relatively easily degradable. In contrast to our presupposition, easily degradable DOM seemed to be less abundant in soil where variables describing microbial activity were higher. Birch soil with higher microbial biomass N seemed to contain less easily degradable DOM than spruce soil.

Conclusion

We suggest that DOM collected and characterized at a certain point reflects more the accumulation of refractory compounds following high microbial activity than the easily degradable compounds that microbes would be using when measured.

Keywords

DOC Properties of DOM XAD Ultrafiltration Soil Litter Microbial activity 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Oili Kiikkilä
    • 1
  • Sanna Kanerva
    • 1
    • 2
  • Veikko Kitunen
    • 1
  • Aino Smolander
    • 1
  1. 1.Finnish Forest Research InstituteVantaaFinland
  2. 2.Department of Food and Environmental SciencesUniversity of HelsinkiHelsinkiFinland