Plant and Soil

, Volume 326, Issue 1, pp 393–401

Effects of nitrogen fertilizer on CH4 emission from rice fields: multi-site field observations

Authors

  • Baohua Xie
    • State Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Bounder Layer Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry (LAPC), Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP)Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)
    • Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (GUCAS)
    • State Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Bounder Layer Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry (LAPC), Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP)Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)
    • LAPC, Institute of Atmospheric PhysicsChinese Academy of Sciences
  • Zaixing Zhou
    • State Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Bounder Layer Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry (LAPC), Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP)Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)
  • Jiangxin Gu
    • State Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Bounder Layer Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry (LAPC), Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP)Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)
  • Bo Zhu
    • Institute of Mountain Hazards and Environment (IMHE), CAS
  • Xin Chen
    • Institute of Applied Ecology (IAE), CAS
  • Yi Shi
    • Institute of Applied Ecology (IAE), CAS
  • Yiyong Wang
    • Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology (NEIGAE), CAS
  • Zhichun Zhao
    • Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (GUCAS)
    • Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology (NEIGAE), CAS
  • Chunyan Liu
    • State Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Bounder Layer Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry (LAPC), Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP)Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)
  • Zhisheng Yao
    • State Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Bounder Layer Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry (LAPC), Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP)Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)
  • Jianguo Zhu
    • State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable AgricultureInstitute of Soil Science (ISS), CAS
Regular Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11104-009-0020-3

Cite this article as:
Xie, B., Zheng, X., Zhou, Z. et al. Plant Soil (2010) 326: 393. doi:10.1007/s11104-009-0020-3

Abstract

There is an ongoing discussion of the possible effects of nitrogen (N) application on methane (CH4) emission from rice fields. However, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) methodologies for estimating the national inventory of CH4 emission from paddy rice production do not consider the effects of N addition. To assess the lack of knowledge about N addition effects on inventory estimates, we recently launched a multi-site observation campaign in major rice cultivation regions of China. The observations showed that, across various climate zones, the application of ammonium-based fertilizers at the commonly-adopted levels for fields in China (150 or 250 kg N ha−1) generally inhibited accumulative CH4 emission during rice season (by 28–30% on average) as compared to no N addition. An increase in application from the moderate level of 150 kg N ha−1 to the high rate of 250 kg N ha−1 did not significantly modify CH4 emission. Our results suggest that disregarding the effect of N fertilization by the IPCC methodologies may not significantly bias CH4 inventory estimates of China. In regions with much lower N addition levels, however, disregarding the effect of N fertilization may result in the underestimation of regional CH4 emission, since these emissions were mainly derived from studies in regions with relatively high N addition rates.

Keywords

Ammonium-basedInventoryBiomassOxidation

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009