Phytochemistry Reviews

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 269–282

Glucosinolates, isothiocyanates and human health

Authors

    • Phytochemicals and Health ProgrammeInstitute of Food Research
  • Richard Mithen
    • Phytochemicals and Health ProgrammeInstitute of Food Research
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11101-008-9103-7

Cite this article as:
Traka, M. & Mithen, R. Phytochem Rev (2009) 8: 269. doi:10.1007/s11101-008-9103-7

Abstract

Concurrent with the increase in our knowledge of the genetic and environmental factors that lead to glucosinolate accumulation in plants, and the role of these compounds and their derivatives in mediating plant–herbivore interactions, there has been significant advances in our understanding of how glucosinolates and their products may contribute to a reduction in risk of carcinogenesis and heart disease when consumed as part of the diet. In this paper, we review the epidemiological evidence for the health promoting effects of cruciferous vegetables, the processes by which glucosinolates and isothiocyanates are absorbed and metabolised by humans, with particular regard to the role of glutathione S-transferases, and the biological activity of isothiocyanates towards mammalian cells and tissues.

Keywords

BrassicaCancerEpidemiologyGSTIntervention studies

Abbreviations

AITC

Allyl ITC

BITC

Benzyl ITC

CDK

Cyclin-dependent kinase

Cox-2

Cyclooxygenase 2

CYP

Cytochrome P450

ESP

Epithiospecifier

GSH

Glutathione

GST

Glutathione S-transferase

HO-1

Heme oxygenase 1

iNOS

Inducible nitric oxide synthase

ITC

Isothiocyanate

Keap1

Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1

MRP

Multidrug resistance associated protein

NAC

N-acetylcysteine

NQO1

NAD(P)H:Quinone Oxidoreductase

Nrf2

Nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2

PEITC

Phenylethyl ITC

ROS

Reactive oxygen species

SF

Sulforaphane

TR1

Thioredoxin reductase 1

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008