Mycopathologia

, Volume 175, Issue 3, pp 351–355

Detection of Cryptococcus gattii in Selected Urban Parks of the Willamette Valley, Oregon

  • Jack A. Mortenson
  • Karen H. Bartlett
  • Randy W. Wilson
  • Shawn R. Lockhart
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11046-013-9614-7

Cite this article as:
Mortenson, J.A., Bartlett, K.H., Wilson, R.W. et al. Mycopathologia (2013) 175: 351. doi:10.1007/s11046-013-9614-7

Abstract

Human and animal infections of the fungus Cryptococcus gattii have been recognized in Oregon since 2006. Transmission is primarily via airborne environmental spores and now thought to be locally acquired due to infection in non-migratory animals and humans with no travel history. Previous published efforts to detect C. gattii from tree swabs and soil samples in Oregon have been unsuccessful. This study was conducted to determine the presence of C. gattii in selected urban parks of Oregon cities within the Willamette Valley where both human and animal cases of C. gattii have been diagnosed. Urban parks were sampled due to spatial and temporal overlap of humans, companion animals and wildlife. Two of 64 parks had positive samples for C. gattii. One park had a positive tree and the other park, 60 miles away, had positive bark mulch samples from a walkway. Genotypic subtypes identified included C. gattii VGIIa and VGIIc, both considered highly virulent in murine host models.

Keywords

Cryptococcus gattii Oregon Environmental sampling Urban parks Douglas fir tree Bark mulch Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii 

Copyright information

© U.S. Government 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack A. Mortenson
    • 1
    • 4
  • Karen H. Bartlett
    • 2
  • Randy W. Wilson
    • 1
  • Shawn R. Lockhart
    • 3
  1. 1.USDA, APHIS, Veterinary ServicesSalemUSA
  2. 2.University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  3. 3.Centers for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  4. 4.USDA, Veterinary ServicesTumwaterUSA

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