Molecular Breeding

, 36:41

Construction of a SNP and SSR linkage map in autotetraploid blueberry using genotyping by sequencing

  • Susan McCallum
  • Julie Graham
  • Linzi Jorgensen
  • Lisa J. Rowland
  • Nahla V. Bassil
  • James F. Hancock
  • Edmund J. Wheeler
  • Kelly Vining
  • Jesse A. Poland
  • James W. Olmstead
  • Emily Buck
  • Claudia Wiedow
  • Eric Jackson
  • Allan Brown
  • Christine A. Hackett
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11032-016-0443-5

Cite this article as:
McCallum, S., Graham, J., Jorgensen, L. et al. Mol Breeding (2016) 36: 41. doi:10.1007/s11032-016-0443-5

Abstract

The construction of the first genetic map in autotetraploid blueberry has been made possible by the development of new SNP markers developed using genotyping by sequencing in a mapping population created from a cross between two key highbush blueberry cultivars, Draper × Jewel (Vaccinium corymbosum). The novel SNP markers were supplemented with existing SSR markers to enable the alignment of parental maps.  In total, 1794 single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) markers and 233 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers exhibited segregation patterns consistent with a random chromosomal segregation model for meiosis in an autotetraploid. Of these, 700 SNPs and 85 SSRs were utilized for construction of the ‘Draper’ genetic map, and 450 SNPs and 86 SSRs for the ‘Jewel’ map.  The ‘Draper’ map comprises 12  linkage groups (LG), associated with the haploid chromosome number for blueberry, and totals 1621 cM while the ‘Jewel’ map comprises 20 linkage groups totalling 1610 cM. Tentative alignments of the two parental maps have been made on the basis of shared SSR alleles and linkages to double-simplex markers segregating in both parents. Tentative alignments of the two parental maps have been made on the basis of shared SSR alleles and linkages to double-simplex markers segregating in both parents.

Keywords

Vaccinium corymbosum Autotetraploid TetraploidMap Genotyping by sequencing 

Supplementary material

11032_2016_443_MOESM1_ESM.docx (20 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 20 kb)
11032_2016_443_MOESM2_ESM.xlsx (15 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (XLSX 15 kb)
11032_2016_443_MOESM3_ESM.docx (15 kb)
Supplementary material 3 (DOCX 15 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan McCallum
    • 1
  • Julie Graham
    • 1
  • Linzi Jorgensen
    • 1
  • Lisa J. Rowland
    • 2
  • Nahla V. Bassil
    • 3
  • James F. Hancock
    • 4
  • Edmund J. Wheeler
    • 5
  • Kelly Vining
    • 6
  • Jesse A. Poland
    • 7
  • James W. Olmstead
    • 8
  • Emily Buck
    • 9
  • Claudia Wiedow
    • 9
  • Eric Jackson
    • 10
  • Allan Brown
    • 11
  • Christine A. Hackett
    • 12
  1. 1.Cell and Molecular Science ProgrammeJames Hutton InstituteDundeeScotland, UK
  2. 2.Genetic Improvement of Fruits and Vegetables LaboratoryUSDA-ARSBeltsvilleUSA
  3. 3.National Clonal Germplasm RepositoryUSDA-ARSCorvallisUSA
  4. 4.Department of HorticultureMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  5. 5.MBG MarketingBerry BlueGrand JunctionUSA
  6. 6.Department of HorticultureOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA
  7. 7.Wheat Genetics Resource Center, Department of Plant Pathology and Department of AgronomyKansas State UniversityManhattanUSA
  8. 8.Horticultural Sciences DepartmentUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA
  9. 9.The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research LimitedPalmerston NorthNew Zealand
  10. 10.General Mills Crop BiosciencesWheat Innovation CenterManhattanUSA
  11. 11.Plants for Human Health Institute, Department of Horticultural ScienceNorth Carolina State UniversityKannapolisUSA
  12. 12.Biomathematics and Statistics ScotlandDundeeScotland, UK

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