Motivation and Emotion

, Volume 38, Issue 3, pp 353–366

Linking job demands and resources to burnout and work engagement: Does passion underlie these differential relationships?

Authors

    • Department of PsychologyUniversité du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)
  • Claude Fernet
    • Department of ManagementUniversité du Québec à Trois-Rivières
  • Stéphanie Austin
    • Department of ManagementUniversité du Québec à Trois-Rivières
  • Jacques Forest
    • School of Management ScienceUniversité du Québec à Montréal
  • Robert J. Vallerand
    • Department of Educational and Counselling PsychologyMcGill University
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s11031-013-9384-z

Cite this article as:
Trépanier, S., Fernet, C., Austin, S. et al. Motiv Emot (2014) 38: 353. doi:10.1007/s11031-013-9384-z

Abstract

This study examined the role of passion for work in the health impairment and motivational processes proposed by the job demands-resources model. Based on the dualistic model of passion, we proposed that harmonious and obsessive passion intervene simultaneously in the relationship between (1) job demands and burnout/engagement, and (2) job resources and burnout/engagement. This model was tested in two occupational samples: nurses (n = 1,179) and teachers (n = 745). Results from structural equation modeling support the proposed model in both samples. That is, both types of passion partially mediated the relationship between job demands and burnout, while harmonious passion partially mediated the relationship between job demands and engagement. Moreover, harmonious passion partially mediated the relationship between job resources and burnout/work engagement. Implications for burnout research and management practices are discussed.

Keywords

Passion for workBurnoutWork engagementJob demands-resources modelDualistic model of passion

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013