, Volume 16, Issue 1 Supplement, pp 129-142
Date: 31 Mar 2012

Factors Associated with Parent Report of Access to Care and the Quality of Care Received by Children 4 to 17 Years of Age in Georgia

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Abstract

We examined factors associated with health care access and quality, among children in Georgia. Data from the 2007 National Survey of Children’s Health were merged with the 2008 Area Resource File. The medically underserved area variable was appended to the merged file, restricting to Georgia children ages 4–17 years (N = 1,397). Study outcomes were past-year access to care, defined as utilization of preventive medical care and no occasion of delay or denial of needed care; and quality of care received, defined as compassionate, culturally-effective, and family-centered care which was categorized as higher, moderate, or lower. Analysis included binary and multinomial logit modeling. In our study population, 80.8 % were reported to have access to care. The quality of care distribution was: higher (39.4 %), moderate (30.6 %), and lower (30.0 %). Younger age (4–9 years) was positively associated with having access to care. Compared to children who had continuous and adequate private insurance, children who were never/intermittently insured or who had continuous and inadequate private insurance were less likely to have access. Compared to children who had continuous and adequate private insurance, there were lower odds of perceiving received care as higher/moderate versus lower quality among children who were never/intermittently insured or who had continuous and inadequate/adequate public insurance. Being in excellent/very good health and living in safe/supportive neighborhoods were positively associated with quality; non-white race/ethnicity and federal poverty level were negatively associated with quality. Assuring continuous, adequate insurance may positively impact health care access and quality.

Disclaimer: The findings and conclusions in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Research Data Center, the National Center for Health Statistics, or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.