Landscape Ecology

, Volume 31, Issue 1, pp 101–117

Convergence of microclimate in residential landscapes across diverse cities in the United States

  • Sharon J. Hall
  • J. Learned
  • B. Ruddell
  • K. L. Larson
  • J. Cavender-Bares
  • N. Bettez
  • P. M. Groffman
  • J. M. Grove
  • J. B. Heffernan
  • S. E. Hobbie
  • J. L. Morse
  • C. Neill
  • K. C. Nelson
  • J. P. M. O’Neil-Dunne
  • L. Ogden
  • D. E. Pataki
  • W. D. Pearse
  • C. Polsky
  • R. Roy Chowdhury
  • M. K. Steele
  • T. L. E. Trammell
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10980-015-0297-y

Cite this article as:
Hall, S.J., Learned, J., Ruddell, B. et al. Landscape Ecol (2016) 31: 101. doi:10.1007/s10980-015-0297-y

Abstract

Context

The urban heat island (UHI) is a well-documented pattern of warming in cities relative to rural areas. Most UHI research utilizes remote sensing methods at large scales, or climate sensors in single cities surrounded by standardized land cover. Relatively few studies have explored continental-scale climatic patterns within common urban microenvironments such as residential landscapes that may affect human comfort.

Objectives

We tested the urban homogenization hypothesis which states that structure and function in cities exhibit ecological “sameness” across diverse regions relative to the native ecosystems they replaced.

Methods

We deployed portable micrometeorological sensors to compare air temperature and humidity in residential yards and native landscapes across six U.S. cities that span a range of climates (Phoenix, AZ; Los Angeles, CA; Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN; Boston, MA; Baltimore, MD; and Miami, FL).

Results

Microclimate in residential ecosystems was more similar among cities than among native ecosystems, particularly during the calm morning hours. Maximum regional actual evapotranspiration (AET) was related to the morning residential microclimate effect. Residential yards in cities with maximum AET <50–65 cm/year (Phoenix and Los Angeles) were generally cooler and more humid than nearby native shrublands during summer mornings, while yards in cities above this threshold were generally warmer (Baltimore and Miami) and drier (Miami) than native forests. On average, temperature and absolute humidity were ~6 % less variable among residential ecosystems than among native ecosystems from diverse regions.

Conclusions

These data suggest that common residential land cover and structural characteristics lead to microclimatic convergence across diverse regions at the continental scale.

Keywords

Urban homogenizationResidential lawnMicroclimateUrban heat island (UHI)HumidityUrban protected area

Supplementary material

10980_2015_297_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (11.9 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 12226 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sharon J. Hall
    • 1
  • J. Learned
    • 1
  • B. Ruddell
    • 2
  • K. L. Larson
    • 3
  • J. Cavender-Bares
    • 4
  • N. Bettez
    • 5
  • P. M. Groffman
    • 5
  • J. M. Grove
    • 6
  • J. B. Heffernan
    • 7
  • S. E. Hobbie
    • 4
  • J. L. Morse
    • 8
  • C. Neill
    • 9
  • K. C. Nelson
    • 10
  • J. P. M. O’Neil-Dunne
    • 11
  • L. Ogden
    • 12
  • D. E. Pataki
    • 13
  • W. D. Pearse
    • 14
    • 15
  • C. Polsky
    • 16
  • R. Roy Chowdhury
    • 17
  • M. K. Steele
    • 18
  • T. L. E. Trammell
    • 19
  1. 1.School of Life SciencesArizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  2. 2.Fulton Schools of EngineeringArizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  3. 3.Schools of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning and SustainabilityArizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  4. 4.Department of Ecology, Evolution, and BehaviorUniversity of MinnesotaSt. PaulUSA
  5. 5.Cary Institute of Ecosystem StudiesMillbrookUSA
  6. 6.USDA Forest ServiceBaltimore Field StationBaltimoreUSA
  7. 7.Nicholas School of the EnvironmentDuke UniversityDurhamUSA
  8. 8.Department of Environmental Science and Management, School of EnvironmentPortland State UniversityPortlandUSA
  9. 9.The Ecosystems CenterMarine Biological LaboratoryWoods HoleUSA
  10. 10.Department of Forest Resources and Department of Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation BiologyUniversity of MinnesotaSt. PaulUSA
  11. 11.Spatial Analysis Lab, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural ResourcesUniversity of VermontBurlingtonUSA
  12. 12.Department of AnthropologyDartmouth CollegeHanoverUSA
  13. 13.Department of BiologyUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  14. 14.Department of BiologyMcGill UniversityMontréalCanada
  15. 15.Département des Sciences BiologiquesUniversité du Québec à MontréalMontréalCanada
  16. 16.Center for Environmental StudiesFlorida Atlantic UniversityDavieUSA
  17. 17.Department of GeographyIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA
  18. 18.Department of Crop and Soil Environmental SciencesVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA
  19. 19.Department of Plant and Soil SciencesUniversity of DelawareNewarkUSA