Landscape Ecology

, Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 229–244

Multifunctionality of floodplain landscapes: relating management options to ecosystem services

  • Stefan Schindler
  • Zita Sebesvari
  • Christian Damm
  • Katrin Euller
  • Volker Mauerhofer
  • Anna Schneidergruber
  • Marianna Biró
  • Franz Essl
  • Róbert Kanka
  • Sophie G. Lauwaars
  • Christiane Schulz-Zunkel
  • Theo van der Sluis
  • Michaela Kropik
  • Viktor Gasso
  • Andreas Krug
  • Martin T. Pusch
  • Klaus Peter Zulka
  • Werner Lazowski
  • Christa Hainz-Renetzeder
  • Klaus Henle
  • Thomas Wrbka
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10980-014-9989-y

Cite this article as:
Schindler, S., Sebesvari, Z., Damm, C. et al. Landscape Ecol (2014) 29: 229. doi:10.1007/s10980-014-9989-y

Abstract

The concept of green infrastructure has been recently taken up by the European Commission for ensuring the provision of ecosystem services (ESS). It aims at the supply of multiple ESS in a given landscape, however, the effects of a full suite of management options on multiple ESS and landscape multifunctionality have rarely been assessed. In this paper we use European floodplain landscapes as example to develop an expert based qualitative conceptual model for the assessment of impacts of landscape scale interventions on multifunctionality. European floodplain landscapes are particularly useful for such approach as they originally provided a high variety and quantity of ESS that has declined due to the strong human impact these landscapes have experienced. We provide an overview of the effects of floodplain management options on landscape multifunctionality by assessing the effects of 38 floodplain management interventions on 21 relevant ESS, as well as on overall ESS supply. We found that restoration and rehabilitation consistently increased the multifunctionality of the landscape by enhancing supply of provisioning, regulation/maintenance, and cultural services. In contrast, conventional technical regulation measures and interventions related to extraction, infrastructure and intensive land use cause decrease in multifunctionality and negative effects for the supply of all three aspects of ESS. The overview of the effects of interventions shall provide guidance for decision makers at multiple governance levels. The presented conceptual model could be effectively applied for other landscapes that have potential for a supply of a high diversity of ESS.

Keywords

Multifunctional landscapes Green infrastructure Nature conservation Environmental management Multifunctionality index Hydrological engineering Restoration Recreation Provisioning services Cultural services 

Supplementary material

10980_2014_9989_MOESM1_ESM.docx (109 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 108 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stefan Schindler
    • 1
    • 15
  • Zita Sebesvari
    • 2
  • Christian Damm
    • 3
  • Katrin Euller
    • 1
  • Volker Mauerhofer
    • 4
  • Anna Schneidergruber
    • 1
  • Marianna Biró
    • 5
  • Franz Essl
    • 1
    • 6
  • Róbert Kanka
    • 7
  • Sophie G. Lauwaars
    • 8
  • Christiane Schulz-Zunkel
    • 9
  • Theo van der Sluis
    • 10
  • Michaela Kropik
    • 1
  • Viktor Gasso
    • 11
  • Andreas Krug
    • 12
  • Martin T. Pusch
    • 13
  • Klaus Peter Zulka
    • 6
  • Werner Lazowski
    • 14
  • Christa Hainz-Renetzeder
    • 1
  • Klaus Henle
    • 9
  • Thomas Wrbka
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Conservation Biology, Vegetation & Landscape EcologyUniversity of ViennaViennaAustria
  2. 2.United Nations University, Institute for Environment and Human Security (UNU-EHS)BonnGermany
  3. 3.Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Geography and Geoecology, Division WWF-Institute of Floodplain EcologyRastattGermany
  4. 4.United Nations University, Institute of Advanced Studies (UNU-IAS), 6F International Organizations Center Pacifico-YokohamaYokohamaJapan
  5. 5.Centre for Ecological Research, Institute of Ecology and BotanyHungarian Academy of SciencesVácrátótHungary
  6. 6.Environment Agency Austria (EAA)ViennaAustria
  7. 7.Institute of Landscape Ecology, Slovak Academy of Sciences (ILE SAS)BratislavaSlovakia
  8. 8.RijkswaterstaatMinistry of Infrastructure and EnvironmentUtrechtThe Netherlands
  9. 9.Department of Conservation BiologyUFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental ResearchLeipzigGermany
  10. 10.Alterra, Wageningen URWageningenThe Netherlands
  11. 11.Oles Honchar Dnipropetrovsk National UniversityDnipropetrovskUkraine
  12. 12.Federal Agency for Nature ConservationBonnGermany
  13. 13.Department of Ecosystem ResearchLeibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland FisheriesBerlinGermany
  14. 14.Technisches Büro für ÖkologieViennaAustria
  15. 15.CIBIO-Centro de Investigação em Biodiversidade e Recursos Genéticos/InBioUniversidade do PortoVairãoPortugal