Journal of Religion and Health

, Volume 51, Issue 1, pp 72–86

Psychological Distress Among Religious Nonbelievers: A Systematic Review

Authors

    • Department of PsychiatryThe Ohio State University
  • Kenneth I. Pargament
    • Bowling Green State University
  • Mark E. Kunik
    • VA HSR&D Houston Center of Excellence
    • Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center
    • Baylor College of Medicine
    • VA South Central Mental Illness, Research, Education and Clinical Center
  • James W. LomaxII
    • Baylor College of Medicine
  • Melinda A. Stanley
    • VA HSR&D Houston Center of Excellence
    • Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center
    • Baylor College of Medicine
    • VA South Central Mental Illness, Research, Education and Clinical Center
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10943-011-9541-1

Cite this article as:
Weber, S.R., Pargament, K.I., Kunik, M.E. et al. J Relig Health (2012) 51: 72. doi:10.1007/s10943-011-9541-1

Abstract

Studies of religious belief and psychological health are on the rise, but most overlook atheists and agnostics. We review 14 articles that examine differences between nonbelievers and believers in levels of psychological distress, and potential sources of distress among nonbelievers. Various forms of psychological distress are experienced by nonbelievers, and greater certainty in one’s belief system is associated with greater psychological health. We found one well-documented source of distress for nonbelievers: negative perceptions by others. We provide recommendations for improving research on nonbelievers and suggest a model analogous to Pargament’s tripartite spiritual struggle to understand the stresses of nonbelief.

Keywords

ReligionAtheismAgnosticismMental healthPsychological distress

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011