Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 440–449

Type 2 Diabetes is Associated with Vertebral Fractures in a Sample of Clinic- and Hospital-Based Latinos

Authors

  • K. L. Kilpadi
    • Department of Orthopaedics MSC-7774University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
  • R. ElDabaje
    • School of MedicineUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
  • J. E. Schmitz
    • Department of Orthopaedics MSC-7774University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
  • B. Ehler
    • Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
  • T. A. Thames
    • Center for Ethics and HumanitiesUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
    • Family Medicine Residency ProgramChristus Santa Rosa Hospital
  • A. P. Joshi
    • Department of Orthopaedics MSC-7774University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
    • South Texas Spinal Clinic
  • J. W. Simmons III
    • Department of Orthopaedics MSC-7774University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
    • South Texas Spinal Clinic
  • J. E. Michalek
    • Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
    • Department of Orthopaedics MSC-7774University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10903-013-9833-5

Cite this article as:
Kilpadi, K.L., ElDabaje, R., Schmitz, J.E. et al. J Immigrant Minority Health (2014) 16: 440. doi:10.1007/s10903-013-9833-5

Abstract

Latinos are the fastest growing ethnic population in the United States and type 2 diabetes is a major health burden in this population, but little effort has been made to study the prevalence of diabetic vertebral fragility in Latinos. We performed a cross-sectional study to determine vertebral fracture prevalence in a hospital-based population of South Texas residents (N = 296). We defined fractures in X-rays as a >20 % reduction in vertebral body height. Numerous variables were recorded, including age, body mass index, indicators of diabetes management and others. 71 % of the sample (N = 296) was Latino. The prevalence of vertebral fracture was increased in diabetic subjects relative to non-diabetic subjects (diabetic 27.9 %, non-diabetic 13.8 %) and, regardless of sex and diabetics status, decreased in Latinos relative to non-Latinos (Latino 16.7 %, non-Latino 26.4 %). These data suggest that vertebral fractures may be a growing concern for diabetic Latinos as well as diabetics of any racial/ethnic background.

Keywords

LatinoSpinal fracturesType 2 diabetes mellitus

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013