Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 390–397

Acute Viral Hepatitis in the United States–Mexico Border Region: Data from the Border Infectious Disease Surveillance (BIDS) Project, 2000–2009

Authors

    • Division of Viral HepatitisNational Center for HIV, Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Jian Xing
    • Division of Viral HepatitisNational Center for HIV, Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Alba Phippard
    • Division of Global Migration and QuarantineCenters for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Maureen Fonseca-Ford
    • Division of Global Migration and QuarantineCenters for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Sonia Montiel
    • Division of Global Migration and QuarantineCenters for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Norma Luna Guzmán
    • General Directorate of Epidemiology
  • Roberto Vázquez Campuzano
    • National Institute for Epidemiologic Diagnosis and Reference
  • Gilberto Vaughan
    • Division of Viral HepatitisNational Center for HIV, Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Guo-liang Xia
    • Division of Viral HepatitisNational Center for HIV, Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Jan Drobeniuc
    • Division of Viral HepatitisNational Center for HIV, Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Saleem Kamili
    • Division of Viral HepatitisNational Center for HIV, Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Ricardo Cortés-Alcalá
    • General Directorate of Epidemiology
  • Stephen H. Waterman
    • Division of Global Migration and QuarantineCenters for Disease Control and Prevention
  • the BIDS Investigators
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10903-012-9604-8

Cite this article as:
Spradling, P.R., Xing, J., Phippard, A. et al. J Immigrant Minority Health (2013) 15: 390. doi:10.1007/s10903-012-9604-8

Abstract

Little is known about the characteristics of acute viral hepatitis cases in the United States (US)–Mexico border region. We analyzed characteristics of acute viral hepatitis cases collected from the Border Infectious Disease Surveillance Project from January 2000–December 2009. Over the study period, 1,437 acute hepatitis A, 311 acute hepatitis B, and 362 acute hepatitis C cases were reported from 5 Mexico and 2 US sites. Mexican hepatitis A cases most frequently reported close personal contact with a known case, whereas, US cases most often reported cross-border travel. Injection drug use was common among Mexican and US acute hepatitis B and C cases. Cross-border travel during the incubation period was common among acute viral hepatitis cases in both countries. Assiduous adherence to vaccination and prevention guidelines in the US is needed and strategic implementation of hepatitis vaccination and prevention programs south of the border should be considered.

Keywords

Acute viral hepatitis Border Mexico Surveillance

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC (Outside the USA) 2012