Journal of Family Violence

, Volume 31, Issue 1, pp 75–83

A Focus on the Positive: Reasons for Not Engaging in Physical Aggression Against a Dating Partner

  • Natasha Grace Llorens
  • Katie Lee Salis
  • Daniel K. O’Leary
  • Jacqueline Hayward
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10896-015-9750-6

Cite this article as:
Llorens, N.G., Salis, K.L., O’Leary, D.K. et al. J Fam Viol (2016) 31: 75. doi:10.1007/s10896-015-9750-6

Abstract

The current study focuses on reasons why most women do not engage in physical aggression against their partner. The sample consists of 170 women, aged 18–35 from across the US. In an online questionnaire, 34% of the sample reported using physical aggression against a partner. Primary reasons for engaging in aggression were “anger [73%]” and “temper [68%].” For those who were not aggressive, primary deterrents were beliefs that “using aggression is inappropriate [72%]” and “under no circumstances is physical aggression okay [71%].” Physically aggressive females were less satisfied with relationships, more accepting of physical violence, and felt more provoked in conflict situations. Across varied studies assessing reasons for physical aggression against a partner, anger is perceived as most prevalent, though a meta-analysis found that trait anger has a small association with intimate partner aggression. The strikingly different results indicate the need for research to reconcile this discrepancy.

Keywords

Partner aggression Dating violence Female perpetration Motives Provocation Non-aggression Relationship satisfaction Acceptance of violence 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Natasha Grace Llorens
    • 1
  • Katie Lee Salis
    • 1
  • Daniel K. O’Leary
    • 1
  • Jacqueline Hayward
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyStony Brook UniversityStony BrookUSA

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