Journal of Fluorescence

, Volume 20, Issue 1, pp 67–72

Relative Quantum Yield Measurements of Coumarin Encapsulated in Core-Shell Silica Nanoparticles

Authors

  • Erik Herz
    • Department of Materials Science and EngineeringCornell University
  • Thomas Marchincin
    • Research LaboratoriesEastman Kodak Company
  • Laura Connelly
    • Department of Materials Science and EngineeringCornell University
    • University of California, San Diego
  • Daniel Bonner
    • Department of Materials Science and EngineeringCornell University
    • Department of Chemical EngineeringMassachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Andrew Burns
    • Department of Materials Science and EngineeringCornell University
    • GE Global Research
  • Steven Switalski
    • Research LaboratoriesEastman Kodak Company
    • Department of Materials Science and EngineeringCornell University
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10895-009-0523-6

Cite this article as:
Herz, E., Marchincin, T., Connelly, L. et al. J Fluoresc (2010) 20: 67. doi:10.1007/s10895-009-0523-6

Abstract

Fluorescent silica nanoparticles encapsulating organic fluorophores provide an attractive materials platform for a wide array of applications where high fluorescent brightness is required. We describe a class of fluorescent silica nanoparticles with a core-shell architecture and narrow particle size distribution, having a diameter of less than 20 nm and covalently incorporating a blue-emitting coumarin dye. A quantitative comparison of the scattering-corrected relative quantum yield of the particles to free dye in water yields an enhancement of approximately an order of magnitude. This enhancement of quantum efficiency is consistent with previous work on rhodamine dye-based particles. It provides support for the argument that improved brightness over free dye in aqueous solution is a more general effect of covalent incorporation of fluorescent organic dyes within rigid silica nanoparticle matrices. These results indicate a synthetic route towards highly fluorescent silica nanoparticles that produces excellent probes for imaging, security, and sensing applications.

Keywords

Fluorescent nanoprobeNanoparticleFluorescenceRelative quantum yieldSilica

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009