Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment

, Volume 35, Issue 2, pp 197–204

The Relation Between Emotional Dysregulation and Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms, Pain-Related Anxiety, and HIV-Symptom Distress Among Adults with HIV/AIDS

  • Charles P. Brandt
  • Adam Gonzalez
  • Kristin W. Grover
  • Michael J. Zvolensky
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10862-012-9329-y

Cite this article as:
Brandt, C.P., Gonzalez, A., Grover, K.W. et al. J Psychopathol Behav Assess (2013) 35: 197. doi:10.1007/s10862-012-9329-y

Abstract

The current study investigated the relations between emotional dysregulation and anxiety and depressive symptoms, pain-related anxiety, and HIV-symptom distress among individuals living with HIV/AIDS. This research is important in its explanatory value regarding the unique effects of emotional dysregulation as it relates to psychological and disease-specific distress given high rates of distress specific to HIV infection (e.g. medicatin side-effects, stigma). Participants included 164 adults (17.1 % female, Mage = 48.40, SD = 9.57) with HIV/AIDS. Results indicated that emotional dysregulation was significantly and positively related to anxiety and depressive symptoms, pain-related anxiety, and HIV-symptom distress. All emotional dyregulation effects were evidenced above and beyond the variance accounted for by demographic and HIV-specific characteristics, and the main effects of anxiety sensitivity and distress intolerance. Findings are discussed in terms of the importance of emotional dysregulation in negative affective experiences within the HIV/AIDS population.

Keywords

HIV/AIDSDepressionANXIETYEmotion dysregulationPain anxietySymptom distressAnxiety sensitivity

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles P. Brandt
    • 1
  • Adam Gonzalez
    • 2
    • 3
  • Kristin W. Grover
    • 4
  • Michael J. Zvolensky
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of HoustonHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryMassachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesStony Brook UniversityStony BrookUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychologyUniversity of VermontBurlingtonUSA