Journal of Insect Conservation

, Volume 20, Issue 2, pp 315–324

Electromagnetic radiation of mobile telecommunication antennas affects the abundance and composition of wild pollinators

  • A. Lázaro
  • A. Chroni
  • T. Tscheulin
  • J. Devalez
  • C. Matsoukas
  • T. Petanidou
ORIGINAL PAPER

DOI: 10.1007/s10841-016-9868-8

Cite this article as:
Lázaro, A., Chroni, A., Tscheulin, T. et al. J Insect Conserv (2016) 20: 315. doi:10.1007/s10841-016-9868-8

Abstract

The exponential increase of mobile telephony has led to a pronounced increase in electromagnetic fields in the environment that may affect pollinator communities and threaten pollination as a key ecosystem service. Previous studies conducted on model species under laboratory conditions have shown negative effects of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) on reproductive success, development, and navigation of insects. However, the potential effects that widespread mobile telecommunication antennas have on wild pollinator communities outside the laboratory microcosm are still unknown. Here we studied the effects of EMR from telecommunication antennas on key wild pollinator groups (wild bees, hoverflies, bee flies, remaining flies, beetles, butterflies, and wasps). We measured EMR at 4 distances (50, 100, 200 and 400 m) from 10 antennas (5 on Limnos Island and 5 on Lesvos Island, eastern Mediterranean, Greece), and correlated EMR values with insect abundance and richness (the latter only for wild bees and hoverflies). All pollinator groups except butterflies were affected by EMR. In both islands, beetle, wasp, and hoverfly abundance decreased with EMR, whereas the abundance of underground-nesting wild bees and bee flies unexpectedly increased with EMR. The effect of EMR on the abundance of remaining flies differed between islands. With respect to species richness, EMR only tended to have a negative effect on hoverflies in Limnos. As EMR affected the abundance of several insect guilds negatively, and changed the composition of wild pollinators in natural habitats, it might also have additional ecological and economic impacts on the maintenance of wild plant diversity, crop production and human welfare.

Keywords

Bee flies Beetles Butterflies Distance to the antenna Electromagnetic smog EMR Hoverflies Species richness Wasps Wild bees 

Supplementary material

10841_2016_9868_MOESM1_ESM.doc (1 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 1063 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Lázaro
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Chroni
    • 1
  • T. Tscheulin
    • 1
  • J. Devalez
    • 1
  • C. Matsoukas
    • 3
  • T. Petanidou
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Biogeography and Ecology, Department of GeographyUniversity of the AegeanMytileneGreece
  2. 2.Mediterranean Institute for Advanced StudiesEsporlesSpain
  3. 3.Department of EnvironmentUniversity of the AegeanMytileneGreece

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