Journal of Insect Conservation

, Volume 18, Issue 5, pp 781–790

Evolutionarily significant units in a flightless ground beetle show different climate niches and high extinction risk due to climate change

  • Katharina Homburg
  • Patric Brandt
  • Claudia Drees
  • Thorsten Assmann
ORIGINAL PAPER

DOI: 10.1007/s10841-014-9685-x

Cite this article as:
Homburg, K., Brandt, P., Drees, C. et al. J Insect Conserv (2014) 18: 781. doi:10.1007/s10841-014-9685-x

Abstract

Species distribution models (SDMs), especially those basing on climatic parameters, have frequently been used to project future species ranges and to develop conservation strategies. As suggested by several authors, we considered both different dispersal abilities and different evolutionarily significant units (ESUs, as determined in an earlier genetic survey). For our study species, the flightless ground beetle Carabus irregularis, SDMs for two ESUs from the western and the Carpathian area of the distribution range showed immense, and deviating future range contractions reflecting divergent ecological requirements. As minimal dispersal SDMs resulted in a stronger decline of future ranges than the maximal dispersal models, low dispersal ability tended to strengthen the already high vulnerability of the cold-adapted mountain species to global warming. Areas shown in our maximal dispersal models as offering climatically suitable habitats for C. irregularis in the future should be considered as potential areas of action in future conservation planning (e.g. assisted migration or assisted colonisation). Thus, both dispersal scenarios and different (if applicable) ESUs should be considered when developing SDMs as useful tools for species conservation strategies adapted to species’ performance and differentiation patterns.

Keywords

Assisted migration Carabidae Low dispersal Maxent Stenotopic Species distribution model 

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katharina Homburg
    • 1
  • Patric Brandt
    • 2
    • 3
  • Claudia Drees
    • 1
    • 4
  • Thorsten Assmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of EcologyLeuphana University LüneburgLüneburgGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Meteorology and Climate - Atmospheric Environmental Research (IMK-IFU)Karlsruhe Institute of TechnologyGarmisch-PartenkirchenGermany
  3. 3.Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS)International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)NairobiKenya
  4. 4.Biocentre Grindel and Zoological Museum Behavioural BiologyUniversity of HamburgHamburgGermany