Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory

, Volume 23, Issue 2, pp 623–668

Increasing Behavioral Flexibility? An Integrative Macro-Scale Approach to Understanding the Middle Stone Age of Southern Africa

  • Andrew W. Kandel
  • Michael Bolus
  • Knut Bretzke
  • Angela A. Bruch
  • Miriam N. Haidle
  • Christine Hertler
  • Michael Märker
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10816-015-9254-y

Cite this article as:
Kandel, A.W., Bolus, M., Bretzke, K. et al. J Archaeol Method Theory (2016) 23: 623. doi:10.1007/s10816-015-9254-y

Abstract

The Middle Stone Age (MSA) of southern Africa represents a period during which anatomically modern humans adopted a series of diverse cultural innovations. Researchers generally attribute these behavioral changes to environmental, neurological, or demographic causes, but none of these alone offers a satisfactory explanation. Even as patterns at site level come into focus, large-scale trends in cultural expansions remain poorly understood. This paper presents different ways to view diachronic datasets from localities in southern Africa and specifically tests hypotheses of environmental and cultural causality. We employ an array of analyses in an attempt to understand large-scale variability observed during the MSA. We evaluated the diversity of stone tool assemblages to model site use, examined transport distances of lithic raw materials to understand patterns of movement, assessed the cultural capacities required to manufacture and use different sets of tools, applied stochastic models to examine the geographic distribution of sites, and reconstructed biome classes and climatic constraints. Our large-scale analysis allowed the research team to integrate different types of information and examine diachronic trends during the MSA. Based on our results, the range of cultural capacity expanded during the MSA. We define cultural capacity as the behavioral potential of a group expressed through the problem-solution distance required to manufacture and use tools. Our dataset also indicates that the actual behavior exhibited by MSA people, their cultural performance as expressed in the archaeological record, is not equivalent to their cultural capacity. Instead we observe that the main signature of the southern African MSA is its overall variability, as demonstrated by changing sets of cultural performances. Finally, at the scale of resolution considered here, our results suggest that climate is not the most significant factor driving human activities during the MSA. Instead, we postulate that behavioral flexibility itself became the key adaptation.

Keywords

Southern Africa Middle Stone Age Behavioral flexibility Cultural capacity Tool diversity Site prediction Ecoprofiling 

Supplementary material

10816_2015_9254_MOESM1_ESM.docx (18 kb)
Table ESM 1List of the localities and assemblages considered in the calculation of the Specialization Index. For Early and Late MSA, square brackets indicate the cultural designation as cited in the literature. (DOCX 18 kb)
10816_2015_9254_MOESM2_ESM.docx (20 kb)
Table ESM 2List of the localities and assemblages considered in the calculation of the Tool Group Index. For Early and Late MSA, square brackets indicate the cultural designation as cited in the literature. (DOCX 20 kb)
10816_2015_9254_MOESM3_ESM.docx (18 kb)
Table ESM 3List of the localities and assemblages considered in the calculation of rock transport distance. For Early and Late MSA, square brackets indicate the cultural designation as cited in the literature. (DOCX 18 kb)
10816_2015_9254_MOESM4_ESM.docx (18 kb)
Table ESM 4Species-specific ecological profiles. Diet classes: HFR=frugivore; HXB=folivore/browser; HMB=mixed feeder; HMG=fresh grass grazer; HXG=obligate grazer. Body mass classes [kg]: 2b=2-5; 2c=5-10; 3a=10-20; 3b=20-50; 3c=50-100; 4a=100-200; 4b=200-500; 4c=500-1000; 5a=1000-2000; 5b=2000-5000. Locomotion types: ARB=arboreal; SAR=semi-arboreal/scansorial; AMP=amphibian; UBI=ubiquitous terrestrial; UNG=ungulate; GRA=graviportal. (DOCX 18 kb)
10816_2015_9254_MOESM5_ESM.docx (19 kb)
Table ESM 5Characteristics of the six specialized herbivore communities in the reference sample based on data derived from 30 national parks in southern Africa. The classification results from faunal datasets: deco=ecological diversities; drel=relative diversities, proxy for structural redundancy. Description of the sample: HFR=frugivore; HXB=folivore/browser; HMB=mixed feeder; HMG=fresh grass grazer; HXG=obligate grazer; SM= small <200 kg body mass; LA= large ≥200 kg. (DOCX 19 kb)
10816_2015_9254_MOESM6_ESM.docx (17 kb)
Table ESM 6List of the localities and assemblages considered in assessment of fauna. For Early and Late MSA, square brackets indicate the cultural designation as cited in the literature. (DOCX 16 kb)
10816_2015_9254_MOESM7_ESM.docx (19 kb)
Table ESM 7Quantification of specialized herbivore communities with regard to climatic regimes and vegetation characteristics. The classification results from faunal datasets: deco=ecological diversities; drel=relative diversities, proxy for structural redundancy. Description of the sample: HFR=frugivore; HXB=folivore/browser; HMB=mixed feeder; HMG=fresh grass grazer; HXG=obligate grazer; SM= small <200 kg body mass; LA= large ≥200 kg. Climatic regime: MAT=mean annual temperature; ∆T (WAQ-CQ)=temperature difference between mean temperature of the warmest and coldest quarter, proxy for temperature seasonality; MAP=mean annual precipitation; ∆P1 (WEQ-DQ)=precipitation difference between mean precipitation of wettest and driest quarter, proxy for precipitation seasonality; ∆P2 (WAQ-CQ)=precipitation difference between mean precipitation of warmest and coldest quarter, proxy for summer (>0) vs. winter rains (<0). Vegetation characteristics: LAI=leaf area index (leaf area in relation to base area); greenness=proxy for photosynthesis activity (varies between 0 and 1); vegetation cover=proxy for vegetation density (varies between 0 and 1). (DOCX 18 kb)
10816_2015_9254_MOESM8_ESM.docx (20 kb)
Table ESM 8Classification functions for both sets of variables. See Table ESM-7 for legend. (DOCX 19 kb)
10816_2015_9254_MOESM9_ESM.docx (38 kb)
ESM 9(DOCX 38 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew W. Kandel
    • 1
  • Michael Bolus
    • 1
  • Knut Bretzke
    • 1
  • Angela A. Bruch
    • 2
  • Miriam N. Haidle
    • 2
  • Christine Hertler
    • 2
  • Michael Märker
    • 1
  1. 1.Heidelberg Academy of Sciences and Humanities ROCEEH—The Role of Culture in Early Expansions of HumansUniversity of TübingenTübingenGermany
  2. 2.Heidelberg Academy of Sciences and Humanities ROCEEH—The Role of Culture in Early Expansions of HumansSenckenberg Research Institute and Natural History MuseumFrankfurt am MainGermany

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