Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 47, Issue 4, pp 1183–1192

Quantitative Sensory Testing in adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

  • Odette Fründt
  • Wiebke Grashorn
  • Daniel Schöttle
  • Ina Peiker
  • Nicole David
  • Andreas K. Engel
  • Katarina Forkmann
  • Nathalie Wrobel
  • Alexander Münchau
  • Ulrike Bingel
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-017-3041-4

Cite this article as:
Fründt, O., Grashorn, W., Schöttle, D. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (2017) 47: 1183. doi:10.1007/s10803-017-3041-4

Abstract

Altered sensory perception has been found in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and might be related to aberrant sensory perception thresholds. We used the well-established, standardized Quantitative sensory testing (QST) protocol of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain to investigate 13 somatosensory parameters including thermal and tactile detection and pain thresholds in 13 ASD adults and 13 matched healthy controls with normal IQ values. There were no group differences between somatosensory detection and pain thresholds. Two ASD patients showed paradoxical heat sensations and another two ASD subjects presented dynamic mechanical allodynia; somatosensory features that were absent in controls. These findings suggest that central mechanisms during complex stimulus integration rather than peripheral dysfunctions probably determine somatosensory alterations in ASD.

Keywords

Autism Quantitative sensory testing Sensory thresholds Hyposensitivity Hypersensitivity 

Supplementary material

10803_2017_3041_MOESM1_ESM.docx (26 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 25 KB)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Odette Fründt
    • 1
  • Wiebke Grashorn
    • 1
  • Daniel Schöttle
    • 2
  • Ina Peiker
    • 3
    • 4
  • Nicole David
    • 4
  • Andreas K. Engel
    • 4
  • Katarina Forkmann
    • 1
    • 5
  • Nathalie Wrobel
    • 1
  • Alexander Münchau
    • 1
    • 6
  • Ulrike Bingel
    • 1
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyUniversity Medical Center Hamburg-EppendorfHamburgGermany
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryUniversity Medical Center Hamburg-EppendorfHamburgGermany
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryUniversity Medical Center HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  4. 4.Department of Neurophysiology and PathophysiologyUniversity Medical Center Hamburg-EppendorfHamburgGermany
  5. 5.Department of NeurologyUniversity Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-EssenEssenGermany
  6. 6.Department of Pediatric and Adult Movement Disorders and Neuropsychiatry, Institute of NeurogeneticsUniversity of LübeckLübeckGermany

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