Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 44, Issue 11, pp 2707–2716

Childhood Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Violent Criminality: A Sibling Control Study

Authors

    • Centre for Ethics, Law and Mental Health (CELAM)University of Gothenburg
    • Swedish Prison and Probation ServiceR&D Unit
    • Gillberg Neuropsychiatry CentreUniversity of Gothenburg
  • Mats Forsman
    • Department of Medical Epidemiology and BiostatisticsKarolinska Institutet
  • Henrik Larsson
    • Department of Medical Epidemiology and BiostatisticsKarolinska Institutet
  • Nora Kerekes
    • Centre for Ethics, Law and Mental Health (CELAM)University of Gothenburg
    • Swedish Prison and Probation ServiceR&D Unit
  • Eva Serlachius
    • Division of Psychiatry, Department of Clinical NeuroscienceCentre for Psychiatric Research and Education
  • Niklas Långström
    • Swedish Prison and Probation ServiceR&D Unit
    • Department of Medical Epidemiology and BiostatisticsKarolinska Institutet
  • Paul Lichtenstein
    • Department of Medical Epidemiology and BiostatisticsKarolinska Institutet
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-013-1873-0

Cite this article as:
Lundström, S., Forsman, M., Larsson, H. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (2014) 44: 2707. doi:10.1007/s10803-013-1873-0

Abstract

The longitudinal relationship between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and violent criminality has been extensively documented, while long-term effects of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), tic disorders (TDs), and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) on criminality have been scarcely studied. Using population-based registers of all child and adolescent mental health services in Stockholm, we identified 3,391 children, born 1984–1994, with neurodevelopmental disorders, and compared their risk for subsequent violent criminality with matched controls. Individuals with ADHD or TDs were at elevated risk of committing violent crimes, no such association could be seen for ASDs or OCD. ADHD and TDs are risk factors for subsequent violent criminality, while ASDs and OCD are not associated with violent criminality.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorders Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder Neurodevelopmental disorders Criminality Familial confounding

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013