Original Paper

Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 38, Issue 4, pp 644-656

Gross Motor Development, Movement Abnormalities, and Early Identification of Autism

  • Sally OzonoffAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry, University of California – Davis Health System, M.I.N.D. Institute Email author 
  • , Gregory S. YoungAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry, University of California – Davis Health System, M.I.N.D. Institute
  • , Stacy GoldringAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry, University of California – Davis Health System, M.I.N.D. Institute
  • , Laura Greiss-HessAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry, University of California – Davis Health System, M.I.N.D. Institute
  • , Adriana M. HerreraAffiliated withInstitute of Child Development, University of Minnesota
  • , Joel SteeleAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry, University of California – Davis Health System, M.I.N.D. Institute
  • , Suzanne MacariAffiliated withChild Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine
  • , Susan HepburnAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
  • , Sally J. RogersAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry, University of California – Davis Health System, M.I.N.D. Institute

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Abstract

Gross motor development (supine, prone, rolling, sitting, crawling, walking) and movement abnormalities were examined in the home videos of infants later diagnosed with autism (regression and no regression subgroups), developmental delays (DD), or typical development. Group differences in maturity were found for walking, prone, and supine, with the DD and Autism-No Regression groups both showing later developing motor maturity than typical children. The only statistically significant differences in movement abnormalities were in the DD group; the two autism groups did not differ from the typical group in rates of movement abnormalities or lack of protective responses. These findings do not replicate previous investigations suggesting that early motor abnormalities seen on home video can assist in early identification of autism.

Keywords

Autism Motor Early identification