Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 38, Issue 4, pp 644–656

Gross Motor Development, Movement Abnormalities, and Early Identification of Autism

Authors

    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California – Davis Health System, M.I.N.D. Institute
  • Gregory S. Young
    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California – Davis Health System, M.I.N.D. Institute
  • Stacy Goldring
    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California – Davis Health System, M.I.N.D. Institute
  • Laura Greiss-Hess
    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California – Davis Health System, M.I.N.D. Institute
  • Adriana M. Herrera
    • Institute of Child DevelopmentUniversity of Minnesota
  • Joel Steele
    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California – Davis Health System, M.I.N.D. Institute
  • Suzanne Macari
    • Child Study CenterYale University School of Medicine
  • Susan Hepburn
    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Colorado Health Sciences Center
  • Sally J. Rogers
    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California – Davis Health System, M.I.N.D. Institute
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-007-0430-0

Cite this article as:
Ozonoff, S., Young, G.S., Goldring, S. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (2008) 38: 644. doi:10.1007/s10803-007-0430-0

Abstract

Gross motor development (supine, prone, rolling, sitting, crawling, walking) and movement abnormalities were examined in the home videos of infants later diagnosed with autism (regression and no regression subgroups), developmental delays (DD), or typical development. Group differences in maturity were found for walking, prone, and supine, with the DD and Autism-No Regression groups both showing later developing motor maturity than typical children. The only statistically significant differences in movement abnormalities were in the DD group; the two autism groups did not differ from the typical group in rates of movement abnormalities or lack of protective responses. These findings do not replicate previous investigations suggesting that early motor abnormalities seen on home video can assist in early identification of autism.

Keywords

AutismMotorEarly identification

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007