International Journal of Primatology

, Volume 34, Issue 1, pp 170–193

Frugivory and Seed Dispersal by Northern Pigtailed Macaques (Macaca leonina), in Thailand

  • Aurélie Albert
  • Alain Hambuckers
  • Laurence Culot
  • Tommaso Savini
  • Marie-Claude Huynen
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10764-012-9649-5

Cite this article as:
Albert, A., Hambuckers, A., Culot, L. et al. Int J Primatol (2013) 34: 170. doi:10.1007/s10764-012-9649-5

Abstract

Tropical rain forest conservation requires a good understanding of plant–animal interactions. Seed dispersal provides a means for plant seeds to escape competition and density-dependent seed predators and pathogens and to colonize new habitats. This makes the role and effectiveness of frugivorous species in the seed dispersal process an important topic. Northern pigtailed macaques (Macaca leonina) may be effective seed dispersers because they have a diverse diet and process seeds in several ways (swallowing, spitting out, or dropping them). To investigate the seed dispersal effectiveness of a habituated group of pigtailed macaques in Khao Yai National Park, Thailand, we examined seed dispersal quantity (number of fruit species eaten, proportion in the diet, number of feces containing seeds, and number of seeds processed) and quality (processing methods used, seed viability and germination success, habitat type and distance from parent tree for the deposited seeds, and dispersal patterns) via focal and scan sampling, seed collection, and germination tests. We found thousands of seeds per feces, including seeds up to 58 mm in length and from 88 fruit species. Importantly, the macaques dispersed seeds from primary to secondary forests, via swallowing, spitting, and dropping. Of 21 species, the effect of swallowing and spitting was positive for two species (i.e., processed seeds had a higher % germination and % viability than control seeds), neutral for 13 species (no difference in % germination or viability), and negative (processed seeds had lower % germination and viability) for five species. For the final species, the effect was neutral for spat-out seeds but negative for swallowed seeds. We conclude that macaques are effective seed dispersers in both quantitative and qualitative terms and that they are of potential importance for tropical rain forest regeneration.

Keywords

GerminationKhao Yai National ParkSeed spittingSeed swallowingTropical rain forest

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aurélie Albert
    • 1
  • Alain Hambuckers
    • 1
  • Laurence Culot
    • 2
  • Tommaso Savini
    • 3
  • Marie-Claude Huynen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biology, Ecology and Evolution, Behavioral Biology Unit, Faculty of SciencesUniversity of LiègeLiègeBelgium
  2. 2.Laboratório de Biología da Conservação, Departamento de EcologíaUniversidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP)Rio ClaroBrazil
  3. 3.Conservation Ecology Program, School of Bioresources and TechnologyKing Mongkut’s University of Technology ThonburiBangkokThailand