International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education

, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 243–271

HIGH ASPIRATIONS BUT LOW PROGRESSION: THE SCIENCE ASPIRATIONS–CAREERS PARADOX AMONGST MINORITY ETHNIC STUDENTS

  • Jennifer DeWitt
  • Louise Archer
  • Jonathan Osborne
  • Justin Dillon
  • Beatrice Willis
  • Billy Wong
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10763-010-9245-0

Cite this article as:
DeWitt, J., Archer, L., Osborne, J. et al. Int J of Sci and Math Educ (2011) 9: 243. doi:10.1007/s10763-010-9245-0

Abstract

Students’ interest in studying science and their aspirations to pursue science-related careers is a topic of global concern. In this paper, a set of data gathered for the initial phase of the 5-year study of Science Aspirations and Careers: Age 10–14 (the ASPIRES project) is presented. In the initial phase of this project, a questionnaire exploring students’ aspirations was developed, validated and trialled with nearly 300 primary school students. Principal component analyses and Cronbach’s alpha revealed that the questionnaire was comprised of a number of unidimensional components and that reliability was acceptable. Further multivariate analyses indicated that students’ aspirations in science were most strongly predicted by parental attitudes to science, attitudes towards school science, self-concept in science, images of scientists and engagement in science-related activities outside of school. Moreover, ‘Asian’ students appeared to exhibit a highly positive set of attitudes towards science and aspirations in science, particularly when compared with White students. Reasons for this observed difference are also explored.

Key words

minority ethnic studentsparadoxscience aspirations

Copyright information

© National Science Council, Taiwan 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer DeWitt
    • 1
    • 3
  • Louise Archer
    • 1
  • Jonathan Osborne
    • 2
  • Justin Dillon
    • 1
  • Beatrice Willis
    • 1
  • Billy Wong
    • 1
  1. 1.King’s College LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.Stanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  3. 3.Department of Education and Professional StudiesKing’s College LondonLondonUK