GeoJournal

, Volume 81, Issue 5, pp 699–716

Geocrowdsourcing and accessibility for dynamic environments

  • Han Qin
  • Rebecca M. Rice
  • Sven Fuhrmann
  • Matthew T. Rice
  • Kevin M. Curtin
  • Eric Ong
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10708-015-9659-x

Cite this article as:
Qin, H., Rice, R.M., Fuhrmann, S. et al. GeoJournal (2016) 81: 699. doi:10.1007/s10708-015-9659-x

Abstract

A consequence of modern society’s increasing reliance on digital communication is the concurrent multiplication and narrowing of information streams, with many channels of digital information, but channels which are difficult or impossible for some individuals to access. Blind and visually-impaired individuals are often left out of this communication, unless accommodations are carefully planned and made to present the information in a usable form. The context of this research is the realm of assistive geotechnology, where web mapping technology and geographic information systems are used to provide access to enabling information and services. This paper presents research on the development of tools to provide transient obstacle information to blind, visually-impaired, and mobility-impaired individuals through crowdsourcing, and research on the general accessibility of local pedestrian networks under constraints presented by transient and permanent navigation obstacles. We discuss the social and technological dynamics associated with the creation and use of our crowdsourcing system and present our effort for comprehensive quality assessment. We conclude that crowdsourcing is a crucial technique for successful deployment of assistive geotechnology, particularly those that involve navigation, wayfinding, and travel in public space. We find that many public health services and other important resources cannot be accessed dependably without the use of crowdsourcing and other techniques for capturing dynamic, changing environmental conditions. More broadly, this paper concludes by addressing the progression of user-generated and crowdsourced content from static data contributions to dynamic place-based services and the enabling role of assistive geotechnology in providing access and help to blind, visually-impaired, and mobility-impaired individuals.

Keywords

Assistive geotechnology Crowdsourcing Public health Wayfinding Quality assessment Accessibility 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Han Qin
    • 1
  • Rebecca M. Rice
    • 1
  • Sven Fuhrmann
    • 1
  • Matthew T. Rice
    • 1
  • Kevin M. Curtin
    • 1
  • Eric Ong
    • 1
  1. 1.George Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA

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