, Volume 77, Issue 1, pp 149-154
Date: 04 Apr 2012

Christopher Hill: Consciousness

Rent the article at a discount

Rent now

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access
This is an excerpt from the content

Christopher Hill’s Consciousness is a valuable contribution to the philosophical literature on consciousness. There are many admirable features of this book. It is written with the wisdom of a man who has thought about consciousness deeply and passionately. It covers a wide range of conceptual and empirical areas in a relatively short space without losing sophistication. Of all its aspects, one which I find most praiseworthy is its intellectual honesty: it is never tired of following the logical implications of its main theses, and it is sincerely ready when there are bullets to be bitten.

The central aim of Consciousness is to provide a comprehensive Representationalist account of phenomenal experiences. It has nine chapters. In the first four chapters, Hill’s arguments are mainly destructive. He specifies six arguments for property dualism and aims to show that none of them is successful. Moreover, three non-representational views of awareness (Russellian Acquaintance, Moorean Transpa