Environmental Modeling & Assessment

, Volume 20, Issue 1, pp 1–16

A Vector Approach for Modeling Landscape Corridors and Habitat Connectivity

  • Timothy C. Matisziw
  • Mahabub Alam
  • Kathleen M. Trauth
  • Enos C. Inniss
  • Raymond D. Semlitsch
  • Steve McIntosh
  • John Horton
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10666-014-9412-8

Cite this article as:
Matisziw, T.C., Alam, M., Trauth, K.M. et al. Environ Model Assess (2015) 20: 1. doi:10.1007/s10666-014-9412-8

Abstract

Landscape connectivity is an important consideration in understanding and reasoning about ecological systems. Two features within a landscape can be viewed as connected whenever a path exists between them. In many applications, the relevance of a potential path is assessed relative to the cost or resistance it presents to traversal. Typically, the least-cost paths between landscape features are used to approximate the potential for connectivity. However, traversal of a landscape between two locations may not necessarily conform to a least-cost path. Moreover, recent research has begun to cast some doubt on the how different types of landscape features may influence movement. Thus, it is important to consider the geographic bounds to movement more broadly. Continuous (i.e., raster) and discrete (i.e., vector) representations of connectivity are commonly used to model the spatial relationships among landscape features. While existing approaches can shed meaningful insights on system topology and connectivity, they are still limited in their ability to represent certain types of movement and are heavily influenced by scale of the areal units and how cost of landscape traversal is derived. In order to better address these issues, this paper proposes a new vector-based approach for delineating the geographic extent of corridors and assessing connectivity among landscape features. The developed approach is applied to evaluate habitat connectivity for salamanders to highlight the benefits of this modeling approach.

Keywords

Species movement Network modeling and analysis Geographic information systems Wetlands Amphibians 

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Timothy C. Matisziw
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Mahabub Alam
    • 6
  • Kathleen M. Trauth
    • 1
  • Enos C. Inniss
    • 1
  • Raymond D. Semlitsch
    • 4
  • Steve McIntosh
    • 5
  • John Horton
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Civil & Environmental EngineeringUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of GeographyUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA
  3. 3.Informatics InstituteUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA
  4. 4.Division of Biological SciencesUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA
  5. 5.Missouri Department of Natural ResourcesWater Resources CenterJefferson CityUSA
  6. 6.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA