Ecotoxicology

, Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 46–57

Maternal transfer of trace elements in the Atlantic horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus)

  • Aaron K. Bakker
  • Jessica Dutton
  • Matthew Sclafani
  • Nicholas Santangelo
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10646-016-1739-2

Cite this article as:
Bakker, A.K., Dutton, J., Sclafani, M. et al. Ecotoxicology (2017) 26: 46. doi:10.1007/s10646-016-1739-2

Abstract

The maternal transfer of trace elements is a process by which offspring may accumulate trace elements from their maternal parent. Although maternal transfer has been assessed in many vertebrates, there is little understanding of this process in invertebrate species. This study investigated the maternal transfer of 13 trace elements (Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, and Zn) in Atlantic horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) eggs and compared concentrations to those in adult leg and gill tissue. For the majority of individuals, all trace elements were transferred, with the exception of Cr, from the female to the eggs. The greatest concentrations on average transferred to egg tissue were Zn (140 µg/g), Cu (47.8 µg/g), and Fe (38.6 µg/g) for essential elements and As (10.9 µg/g) and Ag (1.23 µg/g) for nonessential elements. For elements that were maternally transferred, correlation analyses were run to assess if the concentration in the eggs were similar to that of adult tissue that is completely internalized (leg) or a boundary to the external environment (gill). Positive correlations between egg and leg tissue were found for As, Hg, Se, Mn, Pb, and Ni. Mercury, Mn, Ni, and Se were the only elements correlated between egg and gill tissue. Although, many trace elements were in low concentration in the eggs, we speculate that the higher transfer of essential elements is related to their potential benefit during early development versus nonessential trace elements, which are known to be toxic. We conclude that maternal transfer as a source of trace elements to horseshoe crabs should not be overlooked and warrants further investigation.

Keywords

Maternal transfer Atlantic horseshoe crab Limulus polyphemus Trace elements Tissue distribution 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aaron K. Bakker
    • 1
  • Jessica Dutton
    • 2
    • 3
  • Matthew Sclafani
    • 4
  • Nicholas Santangelo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyHofstra UniversityHempsteadUSA
  2. 2.Environmental Studies ProgramAdelphi UniversityGarden CityUSA
  3. 3.Department of BiologyTexas State UniversitySan MarcosUSA
  4. 4.Cornell University Cooperative ExtensionRiverheadUSA

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