Environmental and Resource Economics

, Volume 55, Issue 3, pp 447–465

The Conflict Between Conservation and Recreation When Visitors Dislike Crowding: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis of the Spatial Distribution of Recreational Beach Users

  • Jamie A. Tratalos
  • Robert Sugden
  • Ian J. Bateman
  • Jennifer A. Gill
  • Andy P. Jones
  • David A. Showler
  • William J. Sutherland
  • Andrew R. Watkinson
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10640-013-9634-2

Cite this article as:
Tratalos, J.A., Sugden, R., Bateman, I.J. et al. Environ Resource Econ (2013) 55: 447. doi:10.1007/s10640-013-9634-2

Abstract

We investigate conflicts between wildlife conservation and recreational use that can occur at open-access sites when visitors dislike crowding. A theoretical model is proposed which determines the spatial distributions of visitors to a beach, given their willingness to walk to avoid crowding and the configuration of beach access points. This model is estimated for three sections of coastline in eastern England using data from aerial video photography. Visitor density is strongly and negatively correlated with distance from access points. Willingness to walk has a highly skewed population distribution. We discuss the implications of these findings for the management of conflicts between conservation and recreation at open-access sites.

Keywords

Conservation Recreation Visitors Crowding Beach 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jamie A. Tratalos
    • 1
  • Robert Sugden
    • 2
  • Ian J. Bateman
    • 3
  • Jennifer A. Gill
    • 4
  • Andy P. Jones
    • 5
  • David A. Showler
    • 5
  • William J. Sutherland
    • 6
  • Andrew R. Watkinson
    • 5
  1. 1.School of Geography, Centre for Environmental ManagementUniversity of NottinghamNottinghamUK
  2. 2.School of EconomicsUniversity of East AngliaNorwichUK
  3. 3.CSERGE, School of Environmental SciencesUniversity of East AngliaNorwichUK
  4. 4.School of Biological SciencesUniversity of East AngliaNorwichUK
  5. 5.School of Environmental SciencesUniversity of East AngliaNorwichUK
  6. 6.Conservation Science Group, Department of ZoologyUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK