Smoking Cessation and Electronic Cigarettes in Community Mental Health Centers: Patient and Provider Perspectives

  • Li-Shiun Chen
  • Timothy Baker
  • Ross C. Brownson
  • Robert M. Carney
  • Douglas Jorenby
  • Sarah Hartz
  • Nina Smock
  • Mark Johnson
  • Douglas Ziedonis
  • Laura J. Bierut
Brief Report

DOI: 10.1007/s10597-016-0065-8

Cite this article as:
Chen, LS., Baker, T., Brownson, R.C. et al. Community Ment Health J (2016). doi:10.1007/s10597-016-0065-8

Abstract

Little is known about patients’ electronic cigarette use, interest in and use of smoking cessation treatments, and providers’ attitude towards such treatment. We assessed patients (N = 231) and providers (45 psychiatrists, 97 case workers) in four Community Mental Health Centers. Interestingly, 50% of smokers reported interest in using electronic cigarettes to quit smoking, and 22% reported current use. While 82% of smokers reported wanting to quit or reduce smoking, 91% of psychiatrists and 84% of case workers reported that patients were not interested in quitting as the lead barrier, limiting the provision of cessation interventions. Providers’ assumption of low patient interest in treatment may account for the low rate of smoking cessation treatment. In contrast, patients report interest and active use of electronic cigarettes to quit smoking. This study highlights the need for interventions targeting different phases of smoking cessation in these patients suffering disproportionately from tobacco dependence.

Keywords

Smoking cessationImplementationMental illnessElectronic cigarettes

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Li-Shiun Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Timothy Baker
    • 3
  • Ross C. Brownson
    • 4
    • 5
  • Robert M. Carney
    • 1
  • Douglas Jorenby
    • 3
  • Sarah Hartz
    • 1
  • Nina Smock
    • 1
  • Mark Johnson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Douglas Ziedonis
    • 6
  • Laura J. Bierut
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryWashington University School of MedicineSt. LouisUSA
  2. 2.BJC Behavioral Health, BJC HealthcareSt. LouisUSA
  3. 3.Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention, School of Medicine and Public HealthUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA
  4. 4.Prevention Research Center in St. Louis, Brown SchoolWashington University in St. LouisSt. LouisUSA
  5. 5.Division of Public Health Sciences and Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of MedicineWashington University in St. LouisSt. LouisUSA
  6. 6.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA